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Old 12-30-2017, 06:59 PM   #16
jax_rox
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Originally Posted by M6L View Post
I'm probably very biased, but I feel like it's easier to screw up camera positioning than it is to screw up during editing.
I actually think the background of an experienced editor would be less likely to Ďscrew upí camera positioning as they know in their head what works in the edit.

Iíd suggest a Director who knows what kind of shots will go together well (in collaboration with a good DoP of course) should (in theory) get more cohesive shots than, say, a first time Director who insists we cross the line because theyíre set on one particular shot...

If youíve got a vision of how the scene might cut in your head, it becomes a lot easier - and youíll see straight away when a shot isnít working.
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Old 12-31-2017, 12:35 AM   #17
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Lots of good answers from people here.
M6L, you can get a basic idea of why certain angles are used if you study good films, read books, watch tutorials, special features, etc. You can start to have ideas of what might be good for your story.

When you rehearse with actors, you keep in mind the story you're trying to tell, & the mood that best enhances it. When you're all at the location, camera positioning depends a lot on what the actors are going to do & how they move in the environment, so you allow for that in rehearsal.

Your actors, DP, & sound crew should all be on the same page as to how you think the story can best be told, & you'll work with them on how to achieve that. You have to take all their input & try to make it work together with what you have in mind, & make adjustments & compromises if needed.

Start small & simple. Find a story you like. Try to think of angles to tell the story. Later, work with actors. The more you do it, the better you'll get.
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Old 05-15-2018, 08:03 PM   #18
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On my first short, I paid for a DP.

I did it all wrong. I wasn't assertive enough and did not know what I was really do. He shot it at 30 fps and I deferred too much of the vision to him. I was more of a producer because I was conscience of time since I was paying hourly. $75/hour!!! So, I relied on him. However, for my next and last short, I will DP it (haha :/) because I've been studying how to bring my vision to life and convey what I want to a cinematographer.

So, finally, the answer... it's circumstantial. Plus, a vision go as far as the budget.
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Old 06-05-2018, 10:05 AM   #19
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On my first short, I paid for a DP.

I did it all wrong. I wasn't assertive enough and did not know what I was really do. He shot it at 30 fps and I deferred too much of the vision to him. I was more of a producer because I was conscience of time since I was paying hourly. $75/hour!!! So, I relied on him. However, for my next and last short, I will DP it (haha :/) because I've been studying how to bring my vision to life and convey what I want to a cinematographer.
I would argue that hiring a DP wasn’t (fundamentally) the mistake. Not conveying things like time base (24p) and overall vision... those are the mistakes, and you’ve already acknowledged that.

Hiring that particular DP may have been questionable, but only in hindsight. Lighting that is flat and dull, poorly-recorded sound, poorly-framed shots, a glaring and obvious C-stand in the background... all signs of a DP who isn’t paying attention. And the lesson here is that these things can be corrected on set. The director should be sitting at a monitor, wearing headphones fed by the primary audio recorder. It’s your job to see and hear what’s being recorded and to speak up if it doesn’t meet expectations.

I’m not sure the solution is just to do it yourself, because that doesn’t give you any more experience in communicating effectively to a DP. You know what went wrong, and that gives you a great place to eliminate those challenges on the next short. A thorough pre-pro meeting can move most of that conversation away from the set, too. It’s there that you look over the storyboard and clarify tech specs (“to be shot at 1080p24” or “to be shot at 4K, 24p”) and convey your visual taste (do you want contrasty, dramatic lighting, or lower-contrast/desaturated, or something else?).

The good news is that you’ve got all this from your last short, so going into the next one should be much smoother.
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Old 06-05-2018, 10:52 AM   #20
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I would argue that hiring a DP wasnít (fundamentally) the mistake. Not conveying things like time base (24p) and overall vision... those are the mistakes, and youíve already acknowledged that.

Hiring that particular DP may have been questionable, but only in hindsight. Lighting that is flat and dull, poorly-recorded sound, poorly-framed shots, a glaring and obvious C-stand in the background... all signs of a DP who isnít paying attention. And the lesson here is that these things can be corrected on set. The director should be sitting at a monitor, wearing headphones fed by the primary audio recorder. Itís your job to see and hear whatís being recorded and to speak up if it doesnít meet expectations.

Iím not sure the solution is just to do it yourself, because that doesnít give you any more experience in communicating effectively to a DP. You know what went wrong, and that gives you a great place to eliminate those challenges on the next short. A thorough pre-pro meeting can move most of that conversation away from the set, too. Itís there that you look over the storyboard and clarify tech specs (ďto be shot at 1080p24Ē or ďto be shot at 4K, 24pĒ) and convey your visual taste (do you want contrasty, dramatic lighting, or lower-contrast/desaturated, or something else?).

The good news is that youíve got all this from your last short, so going into the next one should be much smoother.
You watched my short? I ask because you describe it perfectly

I am not against DPs, just canít afford one now. Definitely, in the future of this career I know. I take partial blame because I didnít have a storyboard, it was rushed, left my shot list, etc.

However, I followed him on IG afterwards and his work seems to be mostly commercial and rap videos. Not cinematography and a film aspect. He has IMDb for a movie coming out, maybe Iíll see it.
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:10 AM   #21
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You watched my short? I ask because you describe it perfectly
I did. After all the discussion (and resisting our critique) that went on last year, I was curious.

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I take partial blame because I didnít have a storyboard, it was rushed, left my shot list, etc.
Youíre the director. Whatever happens, or doesnít happen, certainly falls on you. Nature of the beast, etc. But again these are lessons learned thatíll equip you better for the next one.

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However, I followed him on IG afterwards and his work seems to be mostly commercial and rap videos. Not cinematography and a film aspect. He has IMDb for a movie coming out, maybe Iíll see it.
If heís shooting rap videos and itís not cinematography, heís shooting terrible rap videos. Just sayiní.
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:37 AM   #22
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I did. After all the discussion (and resisting our critique) that went on last year, I was curious.



Youíre the director. Whatever happens, or doesnít happen, certainly falls on you. Nature of the beast, etc. But again these are lessons learned thatíll equip you better for the next one.



If heís shooting rap videos and itís not cinematography, heís shooting terrible rap videos. Just sayiní.
I wonít say terrible, you can check him out on IG at @globalfilmz but from what I see, itís like any other video.

Iíve grown to like natural light with contrast that has a documentary style to it. Thatís what my gf described my style as. Paul Greengrass, Wally Pfister, etc. I concur, it was a learning process to go forward.
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