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Old 09-03-2017, 08:47 AM   #1
nobody
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IS Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction that better?

I know many THINK Quentin Tarantino is Better than Coen brothers. AT LEAST, many think so on writing dialogues. Once I said to some in movies that "Coen bros are superb in dialogues", they rejected such idea and presented Quentin Tarantino as King of Dialogues.
I've watched Pulp Fiction, which they say has the best quotes. AND it is the only movie of him I watched. It had good dialogues, specially at beginning of it.. In that time, I meant how True Grit 2010 was Good in dialogue. Though, after it, I watched Big Lebowski in original Language with subtitles.
AT LEAST, you can't say PF was very professional movie. I understand there is technique behind the dialogues, but not he is the only one can do it. See Big Lebowski, It is not as wild as Pulp Fiction, and it is very Funny and SMARTER than Pulp Fiction....
Fargo Is not better, but in some aspects, there is no movie as funny as it in Hollywood, It is my idea..
In Western, True Grit is best specially their directing is awesome. Plz don't say "There will be blood" Is a good western, Or django unchained which has shaming cinematography, I didn't understand it, though, I don't get attracted to it either.. Your opinions?



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Old 09-03-2017, 09:12 AM   #2
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Here we go with another one of your intuitions. Tarantino is the king of dialogues. He doesn't just write screenplays, he writes novels and merges them into one.
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:14 AM   #3
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You say you watched pulp fiction and it's the only QT film you've watched.
Then you say that django unchained isn't as good. What are you even talking about?

No pulp fiction isn't the greatest movie of all time, there are better films, but it's really damn great.
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:40 AM   #4
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You say you watched pulp fiction and it's the only QT film you've watched.
Then you say that django unchained isn't as good. What are you even talking about?

No pulp fiction isn't the greatest movie of all time, there are better films, but it's really damn great.
I saw PARTs of Django, some parts were imperfect cinematography. it was a difficult movie I could not understand, anyways, it was nothing good in my idea, because I heard what others said about good moments of it and they were all old. Problem is that True Grit was better Certainly above it....

I know it is not the best movie. The best IS "No Country For Old Men". Best of all time in my idea.





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Old 09-03-2017, 09:48 AM   #5
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Unfortunately, someone of another native language is going to be a poor judge of dialog. Of course you can judge the movie but there's no way you can tell how good or bad the dialog is at the level you are trying, when you don't understand conversational English, and I believe, use translators to post here. Are you reading Farsi subtitles by the way?
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:50 AM   #6
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I wonder...

Is it possible to like both? I think Pulp Fiction is a very professional movie.
I think the Big Lebowski is a terrific movie. I like the writing of Tarantino
and I like the writing of the Coen's. In YOUR world you have like only one.
In my world I can like both.

David Mamet is the king of dialogue.

And before him the team of Billy Wilder and I.A.L Diamond – they were the
KINGS of dialogue.

Tarantino sits at their feet and looks up.
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:52 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
Unfortunately, someone of another native language is going to be a poor judge of dialog. Of course you can judge the movie but there's no way you can tell how good or bad the dialog is, when you don;t understand conversational English, and I believe, use translators to post here.

I use no translators... I UNDERSTAND IT IS WELL, I address those parts briefly, though I said beginning parts. Like when they say about hamburger in French, or differs when it is holiest hole of one, or Cheeseburger no no no no....

Edit:
Also; I group the movies into three types: 1- movies which I like to watch. 2- movies which I don't like, because they are bad and I can't watch them. 3- Movies which are different from my love, but not mean are bad......
I Don't like Christopher Nolan's Inception and other films which he made which are often oversimplification. But I was one of those who thought IT DESERVED OSCAR more than King's Speech....


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Last edited by nobody; 09-03-2017 at 10:35 AM.
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:01 PM   #8
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Keep practicing your English. Watch them in 7 years. Then tell us what you think.

I liked Attack the Gas Station and Run Lola Run, but I don't think I can judge the dialog as much as I can the translations(for their wittiness, not their accuracy). With Run Lola Run I understand a decent amount of German, but I'm not going to be able to judge it like a native speaker. I'm not going to understand the cultural depth.

Like any American movie there is a gigantic amount of reference and subtext. Tarantino movies are quite depthy. I may have to watch some old movies or listen to some old music to fully understand the references. Take Reservoir Dogs for instance, the characters reference some obscure TV shows from the early 80s I've never seen. I was born in the 80s but I would never remember the obscure stuff.
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:18 AM   #9
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Keep practicing your English. Watch them in 7 years. Then tell us what you think.

I liked Attack the Gas Station and Run Lola Run, but I don't think I can judge the dialog as much as I can the translations(for their wittiness, not their accuracy). With Run Lola Run I understand a decent amount of German, but I'm not going to be able to judge it like a native speaker. I'm not going to understand the cultural depth.

Like any American movie there is a gigantic amount of reference and subtext. Tarantino movies are quite depthy. I may have to watch some old movies or listen to some old music to fully understand the references. Take Reservoir Dogs for instance, the characters reference some obscure TV shows from the early 80s I've never seen. I was born in the 80s but I would never remember the obscure stuff.
I saw it in a news article, that they are related with some references, but I didn't read the article itself. I can imagine like FARGO, it references to computers software and technology, Israel, politics, USA, and etc. It is deep, I saw some experts say it is the best screenplay ever written. Of course, it was an idea.... It had artificial snow and other cinematography which existed none before. Like eye color.. IT was deeper, of course, like a big film and some about how it gives feeling... So, I am not unaware of these totally... Though, I liked FARGO because it gives a good laughter, I liked Raising Arizona more (which had politics like CIA, SADDAM, ARABS AND JEWS, IRAN, etc)... Just to tell my idea of favorite films.......


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Old 09-04-2017, 10:48 AM   #10
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I saw PARTs of Django, some parts were imperfect cinematography. it was a difficult movie I could not understand, anyways, it was nothing good in my idea, because I heard what others said about good moments of it and they were all old.

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If you only saw parts of it... you can not judge it. For me Ravenous and El Topo are better western's than True Grit. Its.... MY!! ....subjective opinion. I think Tarantino is not interested in complex cinematography. He wants to the best in B-movie's (and I think he is). He wants to excel in it. Al of its movies are about the shift in power between characters... not communicating that in its complex cinematography (like David Fincher or the Coen Brothers). Perhaps the lack of complex cinematography is intentional, because he wants to be true to its own hero's and inspiration.
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Old 09-04-2017, 03:29 PM   #11
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As English is your (sub-par) second language it's not for you to make such sweeping judgements. Dialog - and plot/story, characterization, etc. - is very much rooted in culture as well as language. Translations are difficult because, besides just the language itself, languages/dialects are also reflective of geography, culture, customs, etc.; the mental/psychological "map" changes.

As an example, in many Western countries holding up your hand, palm out, is the signal for STOP. That's what US soldiers did in Iraq and Afghanistan at checkpoints; held up their hands for vehicles and pedestrians to stop and wait for inspection. However, locally in those countries (I don't know about Iran) holding up the hand palm out sorta kinda translates to "Hi! Everything's okay, come on in." So the local folks seeing an upraised hand palm out thought, "Oh, okay, I can approach the checkpoint." This created some very tense situations early on for both the US soldiers and local inhabitants.

So please stop making such sweeping judgements about a language and culture of which you have only a rudimentary understanding. If I held such sweeping opinions I would have you banned from IndieTalk; since you are from Iran you are obviously a Western-hating terrorist. However, my personal viewpoint is that almost everyone on the planet is, at their very core of their being, just like me - people who just want to live their lives in peace, raise their families as they see fit, and just be left alone to enjoy their lives.
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Old 09-04-2017, 03:37 PM   #12
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Maybe better not fight for it.. I said my opinion, true or false, it is less important than to fight..


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Old 09-04-2017, 08:33 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Feutus Lapdance View Post
If you only saw parts of it... you can not judge it. For me Ravenous and El Topo are better western's than True Grit. Its.... MY!! ....subjective opinion. I think Tarantino is not interested in complex cinematography. He wants to the best in B-movie's (and I think he is). He wants to excel in it. Al of its movies are about the shift in power between characters... not communicating that in its complex cinematography (like David Fincher or the Coen Brothers). Perhaps the lack of complex cinematography is intentional, because he wants to be true to its own hero's and inspiration.
Ravenous and El Topo are excellent! Though some have called El Topo an "Eastern" because of its transcendentalism.

Tarantino does do some more complex cinematography. In Inglorious Bastards he does more than usual. The camera angles he does are generally pleasing, but he's no Kubrik or Spielberg cinematographically. Or at least doesn't want to be. He has some of the best characters though. He's really good with people directing.

I think when you compare Coens to Tarantino you have work that could be lumped in together. I think the Coens works are more intellectual, but you have to remember there are two brains behind the scene. That isn't to say that Tarantino isn't intellectual, he has different goals. Tarantino aims for the audience to say "oh dayam!", while the Coens want you to say "shit!"
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:23 AM   #14
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I agree with you Gila Vista.

You free to have a opinion Nobody. Sometimes you can only find where the flaws are, if you make ....sweeping judgements.... You like the movies of the Coen Brothers better than Tarantino.....And that's OK. I think comparing Coen Brothers and Tarantino is comparing apples to oranges.... or comparing Star wars to Schindler's list.
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:06 AM   #15
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For me, only Quentin Tarantino IS not Special. I don't like Django Unchained, BECAUSE of not liking its cinematography, for example, it is bad in my idea. Once I saw, nothing was nice in my idea, not saying I am racist (I myself would like to write Morgan Freeman in a Western), but even those black people were unreal in my opinion. I could not like it, only this.


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