Home Your Ad Here

Go Back   IndieTalk - Indie Film Forum > Making The Film > On The Set

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-19-2017, 11:26 AM   #1
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
About Scene and Shot

What is the basic or best length(in sec) for a scene in ur perspective. And What should be the basic length(in sec) of a shot. So that an actor can memorize dialogs quickly and the shooting will be faster. Because divide and merge concept is always faster than structured concept.

Last edited by satyaos; 01-19-2017 at 11:30 AM.
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today   #1A
film guy
Basic Member
 
Posts: 17

 
Old 01-19-2017, 11:39 AM   #2
directorik
IndieTalk's Resident Guru
 
directorik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: hollywood
Posts: 9,279
There is no basic or best length for a scene. There is no basic or
best length for a shot. The actor will memorize the dialogue BEFORE
shooting.

The divide and merge concept isn't always faster.
directorik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2017, 11:45 AM   #3
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
We can also use some cutaway shots to minimize the long shots. becz taking long shots are quite time consuming and little wrong in shot will put the shot in cycle.
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2017, 06:21 PM   #4
WalterB
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Rotterdam Area, The Netherlands
Posts: 3,448
It all depends on the situation.
Sometimes shooting long shots is the fastest way. Sometimes it is not.

There is no rule for this. Only experience leading to best practises for the situation you'll meet next time.
WalterB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 02:03 AM   #5
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
about scene and shot

clapperboard mentions 3 things, (scene, shot, take) then what is the shot number in above example.
Eg: A conversation scene
{
X : hi, How r u?
y: i m fine
X : "where r u going"
}


Scene, shot, take (1 : A :1) => "hi how r u"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :2) => "hi how r u"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :3) => "hi how r u"

Scene, shot, take (1 : B :1) => "i m fine"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :2) => "i m fine"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :3) => "i m fine"

Scene, shot, take (1 : C :1) => "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :2) => "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :3) => "where r u going"

Where A= 2-shot, B=OTS, C=Close up

is the above is correct?
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 02:43 AM   #6
Sweetie
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 4,262
Quote:
is the above is correct?
NOTE: I hazard a guess you're saying A and C are shot from the same spot/angle/lens.

If you're shifting angle for each line, I suppose you could do it like this, but not only would you be wasting time not shooting the additional coverage while you have the setup, you'd drive your cast and crew nuts before the first break. You'd also get a solid kick to the groin from your editor.

In reality, you'd just run through the scene [X : hi, How r u? y: i m fine X : "where r u going"] as 1a and then the reverse as 1b. You might go 1a WS, 1b, OTS, 1c CU, 1d OTS Reverse, 1e CU reverse.

This has its advantages. A). The actors have the momentum within the scene and b). You don't waste time with multiple unneeded turnovers and c). Using your saved time on getting actual coverage you'll need in the edit.

Does this make sense?

When you'd use that method is when you need to split it up for things like safety issues like replacing the actor with a stunt man etc.
Sweetie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 03:05 AM   #7
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
Sorry i made mistake,

clapperboard mentions 3 things, (scene, shot, take) then what is the shot number in above example.
Eg: A conversation scene
{
X : hi, How r u?
y: i m fine
X : "where r u going"
}

and take increases until the imperfection happens in scene.

Scene, shot, take (1 : A :1) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :2) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :3) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"

Scene, shot, take (1 : B :1) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :2) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :3) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"

Scene, shot, take (1 : C :1) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :2) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :3) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"

Where A= 2-shot, B=OTS, C=Close up are 3-setup's

is the above is correct?
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 04:44 AM   #8
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
In above Example, If i Use the multiple camera,

Camera A=2-shot, camera B= X-OTS, Camera C = Y-OTS

Then How I will slate that,

Scene, shot, take (1 : ABC :1) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : ABC :2) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : ABC :3) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"

or

Scene, take (1 : 1) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, take (1 : 2) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"
Scene, take (1 : 3) => "hi how r u", "i m fine", "where r u going"

Which will be better way slating. And what is the possible disadvantage os Multi-cam usage..

Last edited by satyaos; 01-20-2017 at 04:46 AM.
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 08:17 AM   #9
Sweetie
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 4,262
Quote:
is the above is correct?
Where A= 2-shot, B=OTS, C=Close up are 3-setup's
It might. It might not. It might also depend on what's your difference between a 2-shot and an OTS... but most importantly, it'll depend on what coverage your director wants.

Quote:
Which will be better way slating.
Better between which options? Using a slate and?

Quote:
And what is the possible disadvantage os Multi-cam usage..
Sound, lighting, performance, split focus, higher requirements etc. etc. You wanted only one?
Sweetie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 09:30 AM   #10
satyaos
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 8
Eg: A conversation scene
{
X : hi, How r u?
y: i m fine
X : "where r u going"
}

use 3-setup's, A= 2-shot, B=X-OTS, C=Y-OTS

How u will shoot the above Scene, using Multicam(3-camera) and without using multicam. Now represent your shots on your slate.
satyaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 09:55 AM   #11
Sweetie
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 4,262
Quote:
How u will shoot the above Scene
I wouldn't shoot it. I'd send it back to the writer as it's a boring scene with no purpose. It'd be a waste of one camera, let alone 3.

Quote:
Now represent your shots on your slate.
1A 1 (for both multi and single)
Sweetie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 10:10 AM   #12
AcousticAl
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South of the Mason-Dixon
Posts: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by satyaos View Post
clapperboard mentions 3 things, (scene, shot, take) then what is the shot number in above example.
Eg: A conversation scene
{
X : hi, How r u?
y: i m fine
X : "where r u going"
}


Scene, shot, take (1 : A :1) => "hi how r u"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :2) => "hi how r u"
Scene, shot, take (1 : A :3) => "hi how r u"

Scene, shot, take (1 : B :1) => "i m fine"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :2) => "i m fine"
Scene, shot, take (1 : B :3) => "i m fine"

Scene, shot, take (1 : C :1) => "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :2) => "where r u going"
Scene, shot, take (1 : C :3) => "where r u going"

Where A= 2-shot, B=OTS, C=Close up

is the above is correct?
The problem here is that you're breaking everything down line-by-line. That's a terribly inefficient way to work.

Scenes are numbered sequentially in the script. Scene numbers are then lettered by shot setup (example: 15A for the master shot, 15B for the medium, 15C for the closeup/OTS on one actor, 15D for the other). In each shot, most or all of the converation in the scene will be shot, with some exceptions. Each time the shot is stopped and restarted, the take number advances and the shot needs to be slated.
AcousticAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2017, 10:30 AM   #13
directorik
IndieTalk's Resident Guru
 
directorik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: hollywood
Posts: 9,279
The first scene number will be “22”. After each take the number will change: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and so on.
When the next camera set up is used the scene number will change using letters: 22A, 22B, 22C,
22D and so on - omitting letters I and O because they can be misunderstood as numbers 1 and 0.
After Z, you will move into double letters: AA, BB, CC, DD, and so on. For example:

Scene 22 is Bob and Mary sitting at a table - it’s three pages long. You will set up the “Master Shot”
- both people at the table, camera getting a head to foot shot of both of them. On your slate you
will write “Scene 22 - Take 1”

Scene 22 - This will be the entire scene from one angle. You do as many takes as you feel you need.
Again, shooting all three pages of dialogue.

Then you will move the camera to get Bob’s side of the table. Adjust the lights and set up the dolly
track. Again, you will shoot all three pages of the dialogue, then you will “punch in” to get inserts
and other coverage you might need. These set-ups require only minor adjusting of the lights as you get closer.

Scene 22A - A slow dolly push in on Bob - from a full shot into a close up.
Scene 22B - Close up of Bob.
Scene 22C - Over Mary’s shoulder on Bob.
Scene 22D - an insert shot of Bob lighting a cigarette.
Scene 22E - a close up on Bob’s hand putting the cigarette in the ash tray.
Scene 22F - a close up of Bob taking the contract, looking at it and signing it (from Mary’s point of view)

Now you do the same thing - this time from the other side of the table. This is a major lighting and
equipment change - moving the dolly and track, all the lights and the crew.

Scene 22G - A slow dolly push in on Mary - from a full shot into a close up.
Scene 22H - Over Bob’s shoulder on Mary.
Scene 22J - Close up of Mary.
Scene 22K - an insert shot of Mary putting the contract on the table.
Scene 22L - a close up on Mary’s hand snuffing out the cigarette in the ash tray.
Scene 22M - a close up shot of Mary putting the contract on the table, putting a pen on the contract and pushing it to the middle of the table.
Scene 22P - a close up of Bob taking the contract, looking at it and signing it (from Bob’s point of view)

Another major lighting change. You want to do a dramatic, overhead shot of part of the scene.
You know you won’t be using much of this in the final scene so no need to shoot the entire three
pages.

Scene 22 R - start when Mary puts the contract on the table.
Scene 22 S - zoom in to get only the contract - follow all the business with the contract.
Scene 22 T - while the camera is up there might as well get a shot of the two actors sitting down at the table and then leaving the table. Who knows? You might want to use it.

You continue this until you get all the coverage you need.
directorik is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


©IndieTalk