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Old 01-22-2017, 06:13 AM   #31
WalterB
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Whatever it takes, without risking safety and without surprising cast and crew by adding 8 hours to an 8 hour shoot.
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Old 01-22-2017, 08:34 AM   #32
Sweetie
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Quote:
without risking safety [snip]
Yep, common sense stuff.
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Old 02-09-2017, 12:06 AM   #33
harmonica44
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Okay thanks. When it comes to getting the master shot, does the master shot, have to have every character in the scene for the entire time, in order to get maximum coverage? One of my favorite movies is High and Low (1963), and I love the way the master shots are done. However, in that movie, not every character is in the master for the entire time. Here is an example of a master at 2:19 into the clip:



As you can see, the master has three characters in the beginning of the sample, but then as they move, the camera pulls back and we see more characters, that we did not see the entire time of the shot. So should a master have all the characters in the frame, for the entire time, in order for maximum coverage, of nothing being missed, or do you think it's okay for a master to move, and have characters come and go out of frame, then come back in?
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Old 02-09-2017, 02:24 AM   #34
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They must be in the shot at all times. All of them. All the time. It's a serious no no. If the actors move out of frame, they risk losing their academy award and their movie status with the MPAA.

I find it best if you put sand bags on your actors to stop them from moving off screen. You may need to improvise with stronger actors.

If you're not going to get extra coverage, make sure your camera person presses the special "Red" button that prevents editing. That button is gold. Worth every cent, but it's hard to find cameras with this function these days.

Remind me later to tell you about the purple crayon.
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Old 02-09-2017, 07:57 AM   #35
WalterB
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Stop worrying about what a mastershot is.
Worry about telling your story in a clear way that makes sense.

About that shot: the camera moves to reveal.*
It reveals that everyone is witnessing what was said.
First it focusses on the emotions of the 3 characters and then we see the effect on the rest.
In essence this way nothing was missed: if it would be a total overview, you would at first not know where to look, you would miss the intensity of the emotions and you would miss the moment when you realise everyone heard it.

I think it is a great shot.
*) Moving to reveal is a good motivation to move.

If you want mastershots where everything is in frame all the time: become a director in theater. Then you don't have to ponder these things as there is only the mastershot with everyone relevant to the scene on stage.
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Old 03-27-2017, 11:02 AM   #36
KC7NEC
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So far nobody mentioned the most important reason the shots are normally done in this way:

LIGHTING

Lets me explain, You always want to light the whole scene which would be in the Master or Establishing shot. As to the terminology Master does not have to mean first or most used. It could end up edited to be only for a moment or maybe not at all.

Now back to lighting, you light the whole scene and then you are able to move lights in as need as you progress through the setup for the Medium, Close Up, Inserts. By starting on the outside you may find you don't need to move or change all of the lights each time but only a few of them to fulfill the exact needs of each setup.

this is true even if your only using natural, practical or reflected lighting.
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