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Old 08-19-2015, 04:06 AM   #16
WalterB
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Originally Posted by Theauteur14 View Post
...................
Nah dude. Never fully trust anyone. I know what I am capable of for goodness sakes LOL. Everyone wheres a mask. You have to look deeper than that.
If this your worldview, the world will indeed show it to you.
Just like when you're in love the world looks wonderful and when you're grumpy the world is an aweful place.

I certainly don't see it like that.
On set we all have a common goal, but other people might have a different route in mind. Not because they are evil and sneaky, but because of their own experiences, expectations, fears and desires.
As a director you need to stay on course, while wheighing the merit of all suggestions and opinions.
Trust is very important to be able to both communicate and stay in control.
Actually, I think the fact that cast and crew listen to you is more about trust than power. They should trust you have the overview and complete picture in mind. And it's the style, concept and complete picture you use to measure their input with.

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But the fact that they knew each other was a disadvantage to me.
..............
No, it was not. If they didn't know each other you'd have no cast.
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Old 08-19-2015, 07:28 AM   #17
gorillaonabike
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I get what I want on set as a director through the force of my personality combined with a clarity of vision and an understanding of each of the actors' motivations. Not their character-led motivation, rather what they want to personally achieve.

I learned this on my first short where an actress refused to say the lines on set. She said the lines in rehearsal, had the script for a month, we had a read-through and in addition, her acting CV was interesting. What was worse was she refused to come up with a better option. It was just 'I don't feel like saying this.' My responses e.g. 'what would your character say?' were met with 'I don't know.'

As a director, I've seen some diva-ish behaviour but ultimately, they've come around and what's more, they want to do more with me. Helps that I have a couple of high profile film fests behind me etc... but that's just more of a 'genuine' confidence thing.

I don't know how you get it done but that's just how I do it. Oh, and I listen to other, more experienced people.
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Old 08-19-2015, 10:41 AM   #18
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If this your worldview, the world will indeed show it to you.
Just like when you're in love the world looks wonderful and when you're grumpy the world is an aweful place.

I certainly don't see it like that.
On set we all have a common goal, but other people might have a different route in mind. Not because they are evil and sneaky, but because of their own experiences, expectations, fears and desires.
As a director you need to stay on course, while wheighing the merit of all suggestions and opinions.
Trust is very important to be able to both communicate and stay in control.
Actually, I think the fact that cast and crew listen to you is more about trust than power. They should trust you have the overview and complete picture in mind. And it's the style, concept and complete picture you use to measure their input with.
That's how life is man. Not judging it to be good or bad. But that is how it is. The sooner you see it that way, the better you can protect yourself.

It's a mixture of trust and power. The trust is from the fact that I wrote, I am directing it, I am acting in it, everyone started with me. That I have watched the movie in my head like a million times and know exactly what I want. The power is from how I carry myself and react (and not react) to certain games.

I am pretty good with actors.



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No, it was not. If they didn't know each other you'd have no cast.
Might have been better off...

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Originally Posted by gorillaonabike View Post
I get what I want on set as a director through the force of my personality combined with a clarity of vision and an understanding of each of the actors' motivations. Not their character-led motivation, rather what they want to personally achieve.

I learned this on my first short where an actress refused to say the lines on set. She said the lines in rehearsal, had the script for a month, we had a read-through and in addition, her acting CV was interesting. What was worse was she refused to come up with a better option. It was just 'I don't feel like saying this.' My responses e.g. 'what would your character say?' were met with 'I don't know.'

As a director, I've seen some diva-ish behaviour but ultimately, they've come around and what's more, they want to do more with me. Helps that I have a couple of high profile film fests behind me etc... but that's just more of a 'genuine' confidence thing.

I don't know how you get it done but that's just how I do it. Oh, and I listen to other, more experienced people.
This is how I am on set:
I use my natural charisma to lead me on set. I joke around, tell stories. And I don't talk unless I have to. I am collaborative and I will listen to ideas. But I am serious and I will show that side of me when need be. I don't play games. I am about the work. That's my racing/sports background. There are only a few times where I have to actually show a different side though. You have to keep people on their toes so that they really don't know who you are. My size also just commands respect (six foot tall black man)

Example: I had a neighbor playing music during a scene. I ran up to this dude and started yelling at him after I went up nicely and he just shut the door on me. Up until that point the only person I had yelled at was the DP (on the phone weeks ago) I hadn't raised my voice at all. That changed the tone a little bit. I was still able to joke around and stuff. But people saw that I can be nice, but I can be tough when I need to be. And when I grew tired of the DP's passive aggressive games (I was doing the right thing at first with just letting him whine and talk and not letting it affect me. But it was time to say something). Once I called him out in front of everyone and after that the way he changed the way he was acting for sure.

Life is one big power struggle whether you want to agree to it or not. Being a director is tough because you have to be brutal, cut throat, a little hardcore. But nice, democratic, and etc. It's all about balance.

Last edited by Theauteur14; 08-19-2015 at 10:45 AM.
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Old 08-19-2015, 02:08 PM   #19
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I had a female musician refuse to do anything I told her for the music video so I let my assistants take charge of the whole thing and sat back and laughed as it went to shit.

In future i pick actors/actresses who aren't dicks or divas, the best way to avoid these problems is thorough casting and having pre-meet ups drinks of coffee etc this way you get to know them.
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Old 08-20-2015, 01:39 AM   #20
WalterB
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............

You have to keep people on their toes so that they really don't know who you are. My size also just commands respect (six foot tall black man).........

................And when I grew tired of the DP's passive aggressive games............
Sounds like you are playing games yourself.
But it sounds like it fits your view and it has sort of worked for you.
We're all free to see the world as we want to see it, (as long as you don't cause harm deliberately*) and free to disagree

I never (dis)respected anyone based on how tall or old (s)he is.

PS.
6 foot is just below average height in The Netherlands

(*This is just my opinion, but certain worldviews are harmful, because violence and suppression are core ingredients, like nazism or stalinism)
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Old 08-20-2015, 06:49 AM   #21
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PS.
6 foot is just below average height in The Netherlands
I got to work with Dutch factory workers in Krommenie. I don't know if you know the name, but they worked for a company called Forbo. F'kin giant mother lovers. I'm 5'4 . They were telling me funny jokes about the Germans,... and Belgians and dead birds (I wonder if you know that one haha) Edit: And of course, making fun of themselves also.

Last edited by trueindie; 08-20-2015 at 08:39 AM.
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Old 08-20-2015, 07:19 AM   #22
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I learned this on my first short where an actress refused to say the lines on set. She said the lines in rehearsal, had the script for a month, we had a read-through and in addition, her acting CV was interesting. What was worse was she refused to come up with a better option. It was just 'I don't feel like saying this.' My responses e.g. 'what would your character say?' were met with 'I don't know.'

As a director, I've seen some diva-ish behaviour but ultimately, they've come around and what's more, they want to do more with me. Helps that I have a couple of high profile film fests behind me etc... but that's just more of a 'genuine' confidence thing.
I know what you guys mean by diva-ish behavior. I met an actor at a meetup and she was saying "you know... it's my art and directors need to leave me alone, and just let me do my thing," and the actors around her were agreeing. And I wanted to say, "no, it's not your art. A lot of people are involved, and will remain involved after your part is done," but of course I didn't say anything.

But I've indeed been lucky with the actors I've worked with. I let them know that they're the most important part of the project. And I mean it too. I don't care about lights, and I don't care about camera. I care about the actor's facial expressions and body language, and I work with them to get to a place where we both agree. But yeah, so far, my experience with most actors have been simply awesome.

Last edited by trueindie; 08-20-2015 at 07:41 AM.
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Old 08-20-2015, 02:16 PM   #23
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Film autre: Like this one actress told me: casting is about likability and dependability. My first actress was a sweetheart. But undependable. This actress was dependable for the most part. But not the most fun out there. Even the supporting actress didn't show up on the first day due to going out to a party and getting "slipped" roofies (and I have known her for eight months). But she was cool, nice, funny, and open (we we're going to do a short where she was my romantic interest) so at least there was something to work with.

Walter: The taller you are you can use it to your advantage in terms of creating charisma and etc. I'm not the tallest guy ever. But I have the attitude that goes along with it.

I will say that I don't think it's about figuring out people's intentions. But about seeing what they do to get their desires. That gets to the root. You can spot what someone is doing and really get into their subconscious which really tells you who people are.

Trueindie: Most of my dealing with actors as a director has been good except for this last one. Even the actress from my first two shorts was a bit closed. But she was open enough on set and could be funny sometimes. I've acted in movies alongside divas. But this is the first time that I directed one.

I would say on this short film I was really into how the way it was shot, production value, and just overall visual. I am for sure an actors director (being an actor myself). But I think this time I around became more 50/50 in terms of how I treated my actors and how I treated telling the story visually. I am not a director who just cares about the camera. But I see it as such an important tool to tell the story, just as important as the actors. The way the camera moves, doesn't move, turns, swings all adds up. I love the details of the film that have nothing to do with the actors.

When I am directing an actor at that point I've given them the tools that they need to create their own character (I like to give them music, articles to read, websites, movies etc). And I expect for them to do work on their own. On set I am just trying to see what they are doing to get to the truth of the scene. Then I will steer them into the right direction of how I believe the scene should be played. Everyone has a different psychology, so I try to provide the psychology of the character. And I just try to be open for questions.
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Old 01-06-2016, 12:04 AM   #24
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I think Sfoster was being genuine and finding the root cause of the problem. That Sometimes pay determines their professional attitude...which I disagree with. If you find a solid actor, they come through on many levels both on the camera and off camera.

It's not entirely your art. They are performing it. Sounds like you don't need an actor, you need a puppet. lol.

She read the script and you are damn right. She shouldn't waste your time. If she commits, then she commits. But people are flaky.

But really, you have no one to blame but yourself. If you were in a tight spot and went forward unprepared, then you know you took the risk.
I completely agree. I do think Sfoster was being genuine as well.

That having been said, no need to be snarky, no one is attacking you. Your initial question did read a little egocentric, and in fact every question Sfoster asked you, I had, myself thought during the reading myself. And with the exception of the amount of pay (there is no question it makes a difference, art or no art, sex scenes are a bigish deal), you've answered all of the questions.

All of that having been said, a quick congratulations to you on the start of a very diverse career, looks like you're up to some really good work! Don't get so defensive.
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