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Old 04-05-2013, 02:27 PM   #1
VBoheme
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Super 8 N00b. FPS and Editing

Question. I've been looking into using Super 8 for starting off with short film, since I can score the camera and film super cheap (if not free). I've been looking into runtime/film/superfluous things, and I've got a good read on that.

Here's the thing - two things, actually.

Presentation-wise, I'm looking at doing a tribute to silent film, but updating it. Read: I want to focus on the actual filming process vs spending too much time on audio (which I am actually familiar with). The question is, for making it more "modern," would you stick with 18 or 24 fps (if cost of film wasn't an issue)?

Item two: Since I have absolutely no experience with editing anything but digital video, I was wondering. Would it be feasible to do the filming, have it transferred to digital media, and THEN do the editing? I didn't know if it'd just be counterproductive, since places charge by amount of film for transferring. And assuming I didn't have access to any sort of traditional film editing. I'd have to make a few hour drive at the bare minimum.

Thanks guys! I love the look and feel of Super 8, that's why I'm wanting to give it a go. Analog man in a digital world, as Joe Walsh would say.

Last edited by VBoheme; 04-05-2013 at 02:28 PM. Reason: Expounding and Stuff
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:13 PM   #2
directorik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VBoheme View Post
Presentation-wise, I'm looking at doing a tribute to silent film, but updating it. Read: I want to focus on the actual filming process vs spending too much time on audio (which I am actually familiar with). The question is, for making it more "modern," would you stick with 18 or 24 fps (if cost of film wasn't an issue)?
Silent films were most often shot at 16fps. Then projected at 16fps.
However there was no actual standard so films where shot at anywhere
from 16fps to 26fps depending on the studio. But people of the day
saw the movies projected at the correct speed. We know silent films
to be faster because we usually see them projected (or transferred)
at 24fps. If you want the speeded up look of incorrectly projected film
in your tribute you should shoot at 18 and have it transferred at 24.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VBoheme View Post
Item two: Since I have absolutely no experience with editing anything but digital video, I was wondering. Would it be feasible to do the filming, have it transferred to digital media, and THEN do the editing?
Not only is it feasible, these days that is the only way to edit super 8.
Unless you buy a film editing rig. Sometimes you have to make sacrifices
like driving a few hours when shooting film.
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Old 04-05-2013, 11:32 PM   #3
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Awesome. Have something to go on (finally!) and learned something about film in the process.

And yeah, I don't mind driving to locations so much, but for the editing...that sounds like not so much fun. Especially when I can do all the digital stuff on the laptop from wherever
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:56 PM   #4
itarumaa
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Super8 digital transfer varies a lot conserning the quality.

Best results that I have received are done with Flash Scan.

Please notice that if you have a flickering super8 material after digital transfer, then the quality is not acceptable at all. I did almost 10 super 8 shorts and I never had a flickering material.

Also when you shoot the film, use a measuring tape. If you do the focus by eye, then you might be in trouble later on when everything is out of focus.

When I did my films, there were shot in 18fps and then in digital transfer updated to 24fps.
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:10 PM   #5
Pkepneriv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itarumaa View Post
When I did my films, there were shot in 18fps and then in digital transfer updated to 24fps.
Wouldn't that make the film seem to move at a higher speed that normal?
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by directorik View Post
Silent films were most often shot at 16fps. Then projected at 16fps.
However there was no actual standard so films where shot at anywhere
from 16fps to 26fps depending on the studio. But people of the day
saw the movies projected at the correct speed. We know silent films
to be faster because we usually see them projected (or transferred)
at 24fps. If you want the speeded up look of incorrectly projected film
in your tribute you should shoot at 18 and have it transferred at 24.


Not only is it feasible, these days that is the only way to edit super 8.
Unless you buy a film editing rig. Sometimes you have to make sacrifices
like driving a few hours when shooting film.
Take this with a grain of salt, but iirc theaters used to play movies slightly faster to get in more showing per day. This obviously changed once sound became a thing.
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