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Old 08-30-2018, 09:09 AM   #1
pedramyz
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How to get a professional sound for a project for newcomers.

This thread is for those who are new to sound tech and intend to make a project ( short films, feature films,..) with flawless sound.

For starters I'll ask certain rookie questions.

I have previously directed some short films, but none of them were serious enough for me to get specific sound equipments( I just used the mic on the cameras). Now that I have decided to work on a more or less more serious project ( Entering important film festivals) the sound has become a sensitive issue. The more I get into the technical know hows of good sound recording, the more complicated it gets. Below are some examples of these rookie questions:
1. What are my options if I want to make my movie sound professional if I don't have that much budget?
2. Should I hire a professional sound recorder if I want to get the best result? If I couldn't afford one what should I do?
3. We often notice different layers of sound in scenes. footsteps, wind, environment, dialogues,.. all together co-exit in a scene. How is that done? Do you only record the dialogue at first then you add other layers of sound to the scene in the editing or mixing process? Or do you simultaneously record several sounds of the environment with bunch of different mics?
4. types of specific mics for specific purposes?
Anyone who intends to answer these questions, please note this thread is for new comers. So please go easy on the technical vocabs and techniques please.

Last edited by pedramyz; 08-30-2018 at 09:46 AM.
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Old Today   #1A
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:35 AM   #2
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2. Should I hire a professional sound recorder if I want to get the best result? If I couldn't afford one what should I do?
Yes. Especially if this is a serious project. You can't be worried about the sound as director even if you know what you're doing. You have to direct. So you will be needing someone to do the sound. Whether that is a friend, student, or pro.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:45 AM   #3
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1. What are my options if I want to make my movie sound professional if I don't have that much budget?
Get your dialog recording right in production. That’s the focus of production sound, and if it’s done right and done well, you can do anything else in post.

I’d say audio post is actually the more intricate part of making a movie sound like a movie. That’s where the full soundscape - the audio version of the visual world you’re making - comes to life. It starts with clean dialog, but then it’s all about layers. Many, many layers.

Most of what you hear in a professional motion picture didn’t happen on set. Foley, the art of performing sound effects while watching picture playback, is used to create the sounds of human movement as well as detailed sounds of other objects moving in the picture.

SFX, or sound effects, are either recorded “wild” (outside of a studio, not synced to any picutre playback) or pulled from prerecorded libraries. And sounds that you hear are often a) not the sound of the actual object you see and b) usually layers/composites of several different sounds.

Ambient sound beds lay the framework for any scene. For example, a scene in a city diner will have a constant bed that’s made up of “walla” (generic voices murmuring in the background) and muffled city/traffic sounds bleeding in from outside. These are all added in post, NOT captured with the dialog. The occasional clank of silverware on plates and bowls may also be added in the background (again, in post and NOT recorded on set).

A scene of two people walking down a rural dirt road will have a constant sound bed under it comprised of a light breeze rustiling in the trees, birds chirping in the background, etc. Again, all added in post. And Foley will add the footsteps on the dirt road.

These foundational elements make the visual world believable, because we interpolate what we see in part based on what we hear.

And getting all of these elements - dialog, Foley, SFX, ambient beds, music - to work together comes from getting the mix right, and that’s another specialized skillset and a reason to have an experienced sound designer/editor/mixer on your post-production team.

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2. Should I hire a professional sound recorder if I want to get the best result? If I couldn't afford one what should I do?
Abolutely. Having a dedicated and knowledgable recordist (also known as PSM - Production Sound Mixer) who has the right gear will always give you the best results in production sound. And finding a professional sound designer and audio post mixer will give you the best results for everything else in the sound world.

But if you just don’t have the money to hire a professional... do you actually not have the money? Sure, your budget may not allow for a full day rate for a PSM, but if this is a short film and you’re doing it out of the love of the art, you might be able to find a sound pro who has some free time and is looking for a fun project on the side. That person may work for a discounted rate, or for beer, or just for the fun of it.

The other option is to put together a team of beginners like yourself that includes someone who wants to focus on sound. A very basic kit (which I outlined for you in another thread) can go a long way. Just one microphone used well can get you clean dialog in most situations, but you have to have someone who is dedicated to swinging the boom, operating the recorder, AND actively monitoring through headphones.

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3. We often notice different layers of sound in scenes. footsteps, wind, environment, dialogues,.. all together co-exit in a scene. How is that done? Do you only record the dialogue at first then you add other layers of sound to the scene in the editing or mixing process? Or do you simultaneously record several sounds of the environment with bunch of different mics?
Answered above. Dialog is the job for production sound. Everything else is replaced/recreated in post.

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4. types of specific mics for specific purposes?
This is a very broad question, and probably a bit more than you want to chew on right now.

For production, there are three basic mics that can be useful: shotgun, hypercardioid condenser, and omnidirectional lavaliere (with a wireless system). There are other mics that show up on professional sets, but for the beginner, these are the basics.

The shotgun mic will take the lion’s share of work on the end of a boom pole. Where the shotgun may not be the right choice is in a really reverberant/reflective environment, like a dining room with all hard surfaces, or a bathroom, or any other place where hard surfaces bounce the sound all over the place. That’s where the hypercardioid takes its place at the end of a boom pole. Without getting into the math of it, the same physics that give a shotgun mic its focused pickup pattern most of the time is also its weak spot in reflective rooms, and the hypercardioid will sound more natural in those spaces.

The lavaliere is a good backup if budget allows, and a wireless mic system can enjoy proper placement in places where the boom pole just can’t reach, such as really wide shots that leave too much headroom for the boomed mic to be of anyuse.

Back to the basic beginner’s kit, though, a good shotgun with boom pole and shockmount and wind protection, and a good recorder and good headphones, can get you where you need to be. Just be sure you have someone who is focused on that and that alone during production.

But hiring/recruiting someone dedicated to sound means that person has to worry about all this and, as Indietalk said, you can focus on directing. Just buying a decent starter kit does not guarantee good dialog in production, because that is something that takes practice.

Last edited by AcousticAl; 08-30-2018 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:04 AM   #4
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A very basic kit (which I outlined for you in another thread) can go a long way. Just one microphone used well can get you clean dialog in most situations, but you have to have someone who is dedicated to swinging the boom, operating the recorder, AND actively monitoring through headphones.
The Zoom H1 isn’t going to get you anywhere close to where you want to be. This is NOT a recorder for getting clear dialog.

So, pedramyz, there are three things going on here. First, dialog is a MONO source and the H1 only has a stereo mic pair built in. And those mics pick up WAY too much of what’s going on. Second, the mic needs to be as close as it can be without being seen in the shot. The most basic way to do this is to have a mic on a boom pole.

Sure, you could try putting the H1 on the end of a boom pole... but then how are you going to keep control of it and (even with an extender run for connecting headphones) watch the meters and other display info? And the stereo mics just aren’t going to be helpful anyway. The absolute most basic kit is going to have a field recorder, a mic with a boompole and shockmount and wind protection, a cable to run down the boom pole from the mic to the recorder, and a good pair of headphones.

You want good dialog so you can submit to film festivals? You need to get it right in production. If you can, recruit an experienced sound person who has the right gear and who knows what to do with it. This may or may not cost money. If it’s a passion project and doesn’t have a lengthy time commitment, you may be able to find someone willing to throw you a bone for free or at a seriously reduced rate. You only have to ask, and the worst answer you can get is, “No.”

If you’re commited to purchasing a small kit for yourself, you still need to have someone on your team willing to learn and focus on sound and sound alone. The H1 could possibly work except that it only has 1/8” input for an external mic. That pretty much hems you into something like the RōDE VideoMic series and an extension cable. Not idea, and certainly not the best quality recording thanks to the pre-amps in the Zoom H1 and having to run the 1/8” extension (that means you’ll have some noise floor).

My recommendation for a bare-bones, low-budget kit would be something like the Tascam DR-60DmkII, the Audio Technica AT-875 shotgun, a boom pole/shockmount/windscreen kit for the mic, an XLR mic cable for microphone>recorder, and GOOD headphones like the Sony MDR-7506. There’s a decent, inexpensive custom bag for the DR-60DmkII from Strut that comes with a cheap (but useable) chest harness. Use the headphones during production. If you aren’t listening, you aren’t recording.

Good sound ain’t cheap. Crappy sound gets expensive to fix later.

The third thing going on here is stuff that you aren’t going to record on-set. Production sound is ALL about dialog. Period. The “vague and quiet music” is added in post. Things like footsteps, clothes rustling, objects being picked up, set down, dropped... anything caused by human movement... that’s also added in post. It’s usually Foley if you have the time and the know-how, but can be done using prerecorded sound effects. Whispers... if they’re part of dialog, you do the best you can to record them in production and if that doesn’t work you’ll ADR them in post.

This is for those who haven't read the mentioned thread.

Last edited by pedramyz; 08-30-2018 at 10:09 AM.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:18 AM   #5
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And Foley will add the footsteps on the dirt road.
How do you sync the walking animation with the footsteps sounds? That seems like a really intricate job! Each actor/actress walks in a different pace. Sometimes you don't have a full control over your actors walking pace.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:43 AM   #6
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How do you sync the walking animation with the footsteps sounds? That seems like a really intricate job! Each actor/actress walks in a different pace. Sometimes you don't have a full control over your actors walking pace.
Again, this is Foley. It’s done in post-production, not on-set. A dedicated Foley artist actually watches the playback of the edited picture and performs the footsteps along with what’s seen on screen. So, whatever walking pace the individual actor had, that’s what the Foley artist recreates.



And if you’re using pre-recorded footsteps from an SFX library, it just takes time to slip each individual footstep sound into place... one by one. Again, this is done in post, long after the footage is shot.

Last edited by AcousticAl; 08-30-2018 at 10:45 AM.
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Old 08-30-2018, 11:02 AM   #7
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Again, this is Foley. Itís done in post-production, not on-set. A dedicated Foley artist actually watches the playback of the edited picture and performs the footsteps along with whatís seen on screen. So, whatever walking pace the individual actor had, thatís what the Foley artist recreates.



And if youíre using pre-recorded footsteps from an SFX library, it just takes time to slip each individual footstep sound into place... one by one. Again, this is done in post, long after the footage is shot.
Wow! So much work! Amazing.
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Old 08-30-2018, 12:33 PM   #8
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Anyone who intends to answer these questions, please note this thread is for new comers. So please go easy on the technical vocabs and techniques please.
I posted your last question first. Why? Because it's very difficult to discuss a something if you don't speak a common language. The "technical vocabulary" and associated techniques are one of the very first things you should learn. As with any other discipline - be it filmmaking, medicine, law, architecture, etc. - it can become quite complicated. As many on this forum know I was a working musician for 25+ years, switched over to music engineering/recording, and then sidestepped into audio post. Even with all of that experience behind me it was several months before I felt I had a solid grasp on the processes of audio post, and quite a bit longer before I felt I felt that I was truly competent.

This is not meant to discourage you. However, you do need to understand basic techniques and associated tech speak. At the very least you will understand what your sound team is doing and what they are conversing about, and you can intelligently exchange ideas with them.


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Originally Posted by pedramyz View Post
1. What are my options if I want to make my movie sound professional if I don't have that much budget?
You learn all of the techniques and technical jargon (yes, a very daunting task) and spend A LOT of time - much, much more than a professional or even a talented up-and-comer - getting your sound right. As a one-man-band audio post facility it takes me between 2 (two) and 10 (ten) hours per linear minute to do the audio post on a project. You'll have to spend 2 (two) or 3 (three) times that as you are a complete neophyte. The positive side is that no one hears your mistakes; at least until you release your project.

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Originally Posted by pedramyz View Post
4. types of specific mics for specific purposes?
This goes along with technical knowledge, so here we go with some tech talk. The three most common types of microphones are Dynamic, Condenser and Ribbon. There are two types of condenser mics; Large Diaphragm Condenser (LDC) and Small Diaphragm Condenser (SDC). Small Diaphragm Condenser mics are most commonly used for production sound.

Now we get into Polar Patterns - Omni, Lobar, Cardioid (subcardioid, cardioid, supercardioid, hypercardioid) and Figure 8 (bi-directional).



Production sound uses SDC Lobar/shotgun & hypercardioid mics on boom poles, and omni & supercardioid lavs.

Feeling a bit overwhelmed? And we haven't even gotten to mixers, recorders and time code, much less audio post. That's the problem, you can't know everything, and that's why you need audio assistance from someone.

For a start on production sound basics you should read "The Location Sound Bible" by Ric Viers.

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Originally Posted by pedramyz View Post
2. Should I hire a professional sound recorder if I want to get the best result? If I couldn't afford one what should I do?
Of course you should hire a professional, or, at the very least, retain a talented up-and-comer. You are hiring knowledge, experience and equipment. If you don't want to expend the resources then you have to acquire the knowledge, experience and equipment yourself. The biggest problem is that, even if you spent months gaining knowledge and bought cheap prosumer gear, you will be directing and someone else will be running sound for you, so all of your efforts become moot.


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Originally Posted by pedramyz View Post
3. We often notice different layers of sound in scenes. footsteps, wind, environment, dialogues,.. all together co-exit in a scene. How is that done? Do you only record the dialogue at first then you add other layers of sound to the scene in the editing or mixing process? Or do you simultaneously record several sounds of the environment with bunch of different mics?
Audio post is all about details and layers.

When beginning a project I put together my cue sheets for dialog, Foley and Sound Effects. The larger the project the more important this map/guideline becomes. On a feature project this can me take up to a week.

The first chore (at least for me) is to get the DX (dialog) tracks right. The DX edit is using dialog from the unused alternate takes, DX wilds and ADR (Automated Dialog Replacement) to fine tune the dialog between the characters. You can fix mumbled/unintelligible words, excessive noise, and the like. You can even change the "tone" of the dialog. As an example, in the project "Last Exit" the female character in the opening scene came across as a bit too strident and abrasive, so by using dialog from alt takes I was able to make her more worried and vulnerable.

You can start with "Dialogue Editing for Motion Pictures: A Guide to the Invisible Art" by John Purcell.

The next job (in my personal process) is to give each scene a sonic base, the ambient sound. I have assembled a library of ambient canvases to use - empty street, busy street, office, forest, meadow, restaurant, bedroom, etc., etc., etc. These are my sonic canvases for each scene on which I can "paint" all of the aural details.

Now comes Foley, performing all of the human-made sounds - footsteps, punches, cloth, props handling and the like; details, details, details! This process becomes especially important if you are using DX wilds or ADR.

Your reading assignment - "The Foley Grail: The Art of Performing Sound for Film, Games, and Animation" by Vanessa Theme Ament.

Sound effects is the next job on the list, which for me is completing the ambient atmosphere and then adding everything from doors to vehicles to phones to weapons toÖ You get the idea. I personally (budget permitting) go into the field to record my own sound effects; I get the rest from libraries.

Reading - "The Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects" by Ric Viers.

After that I drop in & edit the score and source music.

Then we mix.

And that's just the process. You'll also need the proper equipment (mics, preamps, DAW, Foley props, etc.) and, of course, the knowledge and techniques.

Once again, this is not meant to discourage you but is a forewarning of what you are letting yourself in for if you decide to handle all of this yourself.

Here's a few more books to read:

Audio Postproduction for Film and Video - Jay Rose
Practical Art of Motion Picture Sound - David Yewdall
Audio-Vision - Michel Chion
Sound Design - David Sonnenschein


So that's where you start.

As IndieTalk and AcousticAl have pointed out it is preferable to retain someone to handle the chores for you; filmmaking is a team sport, after all.

That's it for now.

Peace,

Uncle Bob
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Old 08-30-2018, 03:21 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Alcove Audio View Post
I posted your last question first. Why? Because it's very difficult to discuss a something if you don't speak a common language. The "technical vocabulary" and associated techniques are one of the very first things you should learn. As with any other discipline - be it filmmaking, medicine, law, architecture, etc. - it can become quite complicated. As many on this forum know I was a working musician for 25+ years, switched over to music engineering/recording, and then sidestepped into audio post. Even with all of that experience behind me it was several months before I felt I had a solid grasp on the processes of audio post, and quite a bit longer before I felt I felt that I was truly competent.

This is not meant to discourage you. However, you do need to understand basic techniques and associated tech speak. At the very least you will understand what your sound team is doing and what they are conversing about, and you can intelligently exchange ideas with them.




You learn all of the techniques and technical jargon (yes, a very daunting task) and spend A LOT of time - much, much more than a professional or even a talented up-and-comer - getting your sound right. As a one-man-band audio post facility it takes me between 2 (two) and 10 (ten) hours per linear minute to do the audio post on a project. You'll have to spend 2 (two) or 3 (three) times that as you are a complete neophyte. The positive side is that no one hears your mistakes; at least until you release your project.



This goes along with technical knowledge, so here we go with some tech talk. The three most common types of microphones are Dynamic, Condenser and Ribbon. There are two types of condenser mics; Large Diaphragm Condenser (LDC) and Small Diaphragm Condenser (SDC). Small Diaphragm Condenser mics are most commonly used for production sound.

Now we get into Polar Patterns - Omni, Lobar, Cardioid (subcardioid, cardioid, supercardioid, hypercardioid) and Figure 8 (bi-directional).



Production sound uses SDC Lobar/shotgun & hypercardioid mics on boom poles, and omni & supercardioid lavs.

Feeling a bit overwhelmed? And we haven't even gotten to mixers, recorders and time code, much less audio post. That's the problem, you can't know everything, and that's why you need audio assistance from someone.

For a start on production sound basics you should read "The Location Sound Bible" by Ric Viers.



Of course you should hire a professional, or, at the very least, retain a talented up-and-comer. You are hiring knowledge, experience and equipment. If you don't want to expend the resources then you have to acquire the knowledge, experience and equipment yourself. The biggest problem is that, even if you spent months gaining knowledge and bought cheap prosumer gear, you will be directing and someone else will be running sound for you, so all of your efforts become moot.




Audio post is all about details and layers.

When beginning a project I put together my cue sheets for dialog, Foley and Sound Effects. The larger the project the more important this map/guideline becomes. On a feature project this can me take up to a week.

The first chore (at least for me) is to get the DX (dialog) tracks right. The DX edit is using dialog from the unused alternate takes, DX wilds and ADR (Automated Dialog Replacement) to fine tune the dialog between the characters. You can fix mumbled/unintelligible words, excessive noise, and the like. You can even change the "tone" of the dialog. As an example, in the project "Last Exit" the female character in the opening scene came across as a bit too strident and abrasive, so by using dialog from alt takes I was able to make her more worried and vulnerable.

You can start with "Dialogue Editing for Motion Pictures: A Guide to the Invisible Art" by John Purcell.

The next job (in my personal process) is to give each scene a sonic base, the ambient sound. I have assembled a library of ambient canvases to use - empty street, busy street, office, forest, meadow, restaurant, bedroom, etc., etc., etc. These are my sonic canvases for each scene on which I can "paint" all of the aural details.

Now comes Foley, performing all of the human-made sounds - footsteps, punches, cloth, props handling and the like; details, details, details! This process becomes especially important if you are using DX wilds or ADR.

Your reading assignment - "The Foley Grail: The Art of Performing Sound for Film, Games, and Animation" by Vanessa Theme Ament.

Sound effects is the next job on the list, which for me is completing the ambient atmosphere and then adding everything from doors to vehicles to phones to weapons to… You get the idea. I personally (budget permitting) go into the field to record my own sound effects; I get the rest from libraries.

Reading - "The Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects" by Ric Viers.

After that I drop in & edit the score and source music.

Then we mix.

And that's just the process. You'll also need the proper equipment (mics, preamps, DAW, Foley props, etc.) and, of course, the knowledge and techniques.

Once again, this is not meant to discourage you but is a forewarning of what you are letting yourself in for if you decide to handle all of this yourself.

Here's a few more books to read:

Audio Postproduction for Film and Video - Jay Rose
Practical Art of Motion Picture Sound - David Yewdall
Audio-Vision - Michel Chion
Sound Design - David Sonnenschein


So that's where you start.

As IndieTalk and AcousticAl have pointed out it is preferable to retain someone to handle the chores for you; filmmaking is a team sport, after all.

That's it for now.

Peace,

Uncle Bob
after reading this, I will definitely hire a professional, hands down! I promise I will.
But I'd like to learn many of this stuff. They are really interesting. and as you mentioned it smooths the correlation between the director and the recordist.

There is a catch however, Finding a professional recorder ( with international standards in Iran). You can watch the trailers of some Iranian movies in youtube to see my point. You can check one of the most famous ones, A separation by asghar farhadi. Here is the link :



watch the trailer. All the scenes have no more than 2,3 layers of sound. Dialogue, and ambient( This includes Foley, sound effects, ambient, everything!). Or even one layer! They record the dialogue and other sounds all simultaneously together. You hear how their voice echoes at the beginning of the trailer? ( When they are in a divorce office). Even if they used the same process as you mentioned, still the sound for this movie is not even close to the standards of Hollywood or international standards. and we'r talking about one of the most reputable filmmakers in Iran with relatively high budgets for his movies (compared to other Iranian movie budgets). Now what is causing this poor sound? low budget or lack of professional recorders in Iran? ( I assume both). If this guy who had access to a lot more professionals and had a lot more budget than I do, can't get the sound right, Can I still overcome this challenge and make a good sound if I follow your instructions?

Last edited by pedramyz; 08-30-2018 at 03:46 PM.
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Old 08-30-2018, 04:17 PM   #10
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watch the trailer. All the scenes have no more than 2,3 layers of sound. Dialogue, and ambient( This includes Foley, sound effects, ambient, everything!). Or even one layer! They record the dialogue and other sounds all simultaneously together.
A movie trailer is not an accurate representation of the film as far as audio is concerned. Trailers are driven specifically by dialog, heavy music, and added sound effects that are not part of the actual film. I guarantee there’s more in there than you think you hear, and that the film itself has a sound design that is more complex.

Dialog itself has tonality dependent both on the physical environment and on the framing of the shot and distance of the actors from the viewer’s perspective. Sound standards do vary from country to country. There are film aesthetics typical of some nations where dialog is distorted, predominantly ADR, and often poorly done. Especially on hugely-popular, low-budget action films. But by and large, clean and clear dialog is not unique to Hollywood

But what the trailer shows isn’t actually bad at all. Some scenes are in some pretty reverberant rooms, but the mic is still in close. Ask around and see who in your community is available who has the gear and the experience. Ask to see their previous work, but remember that the finished film is rarely accurate to the original production sound because SO much happens with audio post-production. If you have working, professional PSMs/recordists in your area, I think you’ll find yourself in a good starting place.

Besides, part of your job as a director is to communicate your needs to the other departments on your crew. As Bob said, this is a team sport. You have to be able to give a clear explanation to your sound crew just as you do to your set designers, wardrobe, lighting... that’s a big part of what being a director is.
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Old 08-30-2018, 04:36 PM   #11
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A movie trailer is not an accurate representation of the film as far as audio is concerned. Trailers are driven specifically by dialog, heavy music, and added sound effects that are not part of the actual film. I guarantee there’s more in there than you think you hear, and that the film itself has a sound design that is more complex.

Dialog itself has tonality dependent both on the physical environment and on the framing of the shot and distance of the actors from the viewer’s perspective. Sound standards do vary from country to country. There are film aesthetics typical of some nations where dialog is distorted, predominantly ADR, and often poorly done. Especially on hugely-popular, low-budget action films. But by and large, clean and clear dialog is not unique to Hollywood

But what the trailer shows isn’t actually bad at all. Some scenes are in some pretty reverberant rooms, but the mic is still in close.
I didn't say it's bad, I said it's not close to Hollywood or international standards. Besides, I watched the movie in theater, not much of a difference between the trailer and the actual movie, with the exception of the music. The dialogues constantly echo in interiors, Most scenes are either raw with no foley or if they do have foley the sounds are really unnatural. ( You saw the scene where the guy headbuts the other?) You hear the sound for that action?! That's exactly the same sound happening in the movie.
I know this movie won academy awards, and everybody likes to praise this movie in every aspect possible, but if we are not biased here, the sound for this movie doesn't feel the same way as american movies do( Not neat enough somehow). why?

Last edited by pedramyz; 08-30-2018 at 04:49 PM.
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Old 08-31-2018, 01:39 AM   #12
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Berlin International Film Festival .....that's not bad pedramyz. I think its not the same because of a lower budget. Why not look for a new recorder in Europe?

Last edited by Feutus Lapdance; 08-31-2018 at 01:43 AM.
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Old 08-31-2018, 07:14 AM   #13
pedramyz
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Berlin International Film Festival .....that's not bad pedramyz. I think its not the same because of a lower budget. Why not look for a new recorder in Europe?
Well there is the matter of budget as I said. Asking a Europian recorder to travel all the way to Iran( providing if Iranian government give them visa), and stay here for at least a week is gonna cost a lot of money. Besides I don't think any professional recorder is willing to spend all these resources to help an unknown filmmaker in Iran. That's a big ask from Europian recorders.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:23 AM   #14
Feutus Lapdance
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A plane ticket is around... 300,- from Amsterdam I dont know how much a visa is. you wanna record a short or a long movie?
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:37 AM   #15
pedramyz
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A plane ticket is around... 300,- from Amsterdam I dont know how much a visa is. you wanna record a short or a long movie?
A short movie around 15-20 minutes or so.
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