Home

Go Back   IndieTalk - Indie Film Forum > The Biz > Hollywood

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-02-2018, 01:32 PM   #16
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
For festivals, if you are happy with the email agreement and think anything more will spook them just go for it.

If the film gets sold, makes money in any way, or if anyone wants to use any portion of the film with the music, then you need to work that out legally.
Yes, they mentioned this too. If I want to use the film in any commercial way I have to contact them for negotiation. And if anyone wants to use any portion of the film they have to go through me first right? So on both sides I have control here.

Last edited by pedramyz; 12-02-2018 at 01:35 PM.
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Today   #1A
film guy
Basic Member
 
Posts: 17

 
Old 12-02-2018, 01:41 PM   #17
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
Synchronization (songwriter) rights means you have the right to use that compostion synced with your picture. Then there's master rights, of who own the recording (not the songwriting).

If a TV show wants to show a clip of your movie etc., you are usually covered, but some contracts specify that music must be cleared once again.

BUT you don't have neither, you have an email.
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 01:52 PM   #18
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
"The most important thing to know is that there are two rights to every song. There is the person who wrote the song (who holds the publisher rights, aka “sync” rights) and the person who recorded it (who holds the “master” rights). To use this piece of music you need permission from both entities. You can listen to a song like “All Along the Watchtower” by Jimi Hendrix, but you may not know that the writer is Bob Dylan. To determine who owns the rights to songs, the websites ascap.com and bmi.com are extremely helpful."
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:07 PM   #19
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
"The most important thing to know is that there are two rights to every song. There is the person who wrote the song (who holds the publisher rights, aka “sync” rights) and the person who recorded it (who holds the “master” rights). To use this piece of music you need permission from both entities. You can listen to a song like “All Along the Watchtower” by Jimi Hendrix, but you may not know that the writer is Bob Dylan. To determine who owns the rights to songs, the websites ascap.com and bmi.com are extremely helpful."
They said that I should use this sentence for the credit : All Writing and production by Simon Posford and Benji Vaughan. Published by Twisted Music Limited UK. Copyright Twisted Records Limited UK

Doesn't this cover both sync and publishing rights ? The founder of the publishing company "Twisted records" is Simon posford himself, the composer of the mentioned tracks.

Last edited by pedramyz; 12-02-2018 at 04:10 PM.
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:11 PM   #20
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
That sentence does not say who owns the recording but I would assume the band does. That's why doing it right is good. No need to assume!

I am in a band. When I record we own the recordings. If we were signed, we may not. Even if we were not signed, sometimes the producer is part of the ownership. You never know!
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:14 PM   #21
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
That sentence does not say who owns the recording but I would assume the band does. That's why doing it right is good. No need to assume!

I am in a band. When I record we own the recordings. If we were signed, we may not. Even if we were not signed, sometimes the producer is part of the ownership. You never know!
ok I will email them and clear this out. Thanks for the heads up.
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:15 PM   #22
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
For example, you may clear the rights to use the song Happy Birthday. But if I recorded that song and sang it, you would not have the rights to use MY recording. Get it? That's the master license.
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:20 PM   #23
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
For example, you may clear the rights to use the song Happy Birthday. But if I recorded that song and sang it, you would not have the rights to use MY recording. Get it? That's the master license.
These tracks don't have a singer. But about that recording ( master right ) I guess I have to ask them again.
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:32 PM   #24
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
Singing doesn't matter lol.

There's a songwriting (sync) license of who wrote it..
There's a master license of who owns the actual recording.
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:34 PM   #25
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
You can clear the rights to use Happy Birthday, but that does not mean you can use my rendition on the keyboard. You would have to record it yourself, or get a master licence. Get it?
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:36 PM   #26
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
Singing doesn't matter lol.
OK , you said "sang" in your example. So I thought maybe people should ask for the singer's permission to be able to clear the rights. As I said I'm really green when it comes to copy right law
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:40 PM   #27
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
You can clear the rights to use Happy Birthday, but that does not mean you can use my rendition on the keyboard. You would have to record it yourself, or get a master licence. Get it?

Isn't recording part of the "produced" right?
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:43 PM   #28
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Also that recording part gets sensitive when there are usually remixes or remakes of certain tracks which is not the case for these tracks. Did I realize the sensitivity of the recording subject right?
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:45 PM   #29
indietalk
IndieTalk Founder
 
indietalk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 11,258
You need the rights to the song and the recording. These are the synchronization and master licenses respectively.

They likely own both.

Not sure how to explain it better. When you get the sync license it is for the song. That song may have been recorded by multiple artists, and remastered, etc. You needs the right for the actual recording that you are using.

Prince wrote Nothing Compares To You. It was made popular by Sinead O'Connor. You can secure the sync rights to use that song, but that does not permit you to choose whatever recording you like. You then need the master licence for that "version".
indietalk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2018, 04:55 PM   #30
pedramyz
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tehran - Iran
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by indietalk View Post
You can secure the sync rights to use that song, but that does not permit you to choose whatever recording you like. You then need the master licence for that "version".
Yes yes I got it. Forget my last post.

For me composing and recording was always the same thing( in my folly) . That's why I got confused. Now I get it. You can right a song and performers can play it. But the guy who records that performing has the recording right. I always thought composers do the recordings themselves. and also with these music composing apps there is no such thing as recording right? the guy who's composing the track in a music app is simultaneously recording the track. That is if recording means what I think it means ( Recording a live performance in a studio or something ).

Last edited by pedramyz; 12-02-2018 at 05:04 PM.
pedramyz is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


©IndieTalk