Home

Go Back   IndieTalk - Indie Film Forum > The Biz > Hollywood

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-03-2011, 01:14 AM   #1
mrbigchin
Basic Member
 
mrbigchin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
Posts: 99
Question Do you like your work?

This is a question I ask a lot of filmmakers, and I find myself not being able to judge my own movies. A few weeks ago was screening day for my film class, and i walked in there thinking my movie was a pill of garbage. At the end of the day everyone really liked my film and it was the best in the class.
And yet I still don't think it's very good.

Anyways I want to know how you guys feel, do you like your work?
mrbigchin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today   #1A
film guy
Basic Member
 
Posts: 17

 
Old 01-03-2011, 01:41 AM   #2
Scoopicman
Premiere Member
 
Scoopicman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 1,830
I think there is a difference between liking your work and being satisfied with it. I always liked my work and wasn't really slapped into reality, until some of it went into actual release and pissed some viewers off.

My current state is some discontent and the need to improve to the point where viewers won't be thinking of "the budget." Some elements work well - I'm pretty good with writing a "plot," but have been weak on character arc. I'm good with action, but weak with being subtle. I think I have the ability to do exceptional work, but have over-reached with most of my projects. When you try to do too much, that only exposes the flaws.

I guess what I'm saying is, I like my work, but I am not satisfied with my work.
Scoopicman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 01:46 AM   #3
Zensteve
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Zensteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Unfashionable NoHo
Posts: 11,051
Quote:
do you like your work?
Yes... but the next project must be better... so no?

Difficult question, really.
Zensteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 03:33 AM   #4
Papertwinproductions
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Papertwinproductions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 2,539
We're now speaking of taste, it's not unknown that somebody creates something that they dislike.

However, i don't believe this was the questions intent.

I believe it healthy to be a "Perfectionist", to a degree. The need to improve lingers long after every project. Yet, this in itself shows the growth in your field, over what could be a small period of time, that you're now torn within instances of pardon, or a technique you happened not to know. The real importance, and true value, is that you recognize this as growth, and remembering to incorporate those that escaped you in the last.

Last edited by Papertwinproductions; 01-03-2011 at 03:59 AM.
Papertwinproductions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 03:39 AM   #5
Defjon
Basic Member
 
Defjon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: California
Posts: 196
Disliking your work leaves room for improvement.
Defjon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 07:16 AM   #6
Cracker Funk
Basic Member
 
Cracker Funk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Also noneofyourbusiness
Posts: 9,625
I'm my own worst critic. But generally speaking, I like my work. Especially immediately after I finish it. The immediate satisfaction of finishing the project gets me high, and I'm not as critical of my own work, after that high has worn off. As time goes by, I notice more and more faults, but by then, I'm usually cool with accepting those faults as part of the learning process.
Cracker Funk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 07:54 AM   #7
M1chae1
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
M1chae1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,330
I think you have to be honest with yourself...that is most important. And as said above, you have to strive for your next project to be superior in all realms.

I think some filmmakers (actuall a lot) are blind to how low quality their work is...they will say incredible things like, "I want to submit this to Cannes", and "We're going to make money on this"...and the truth is, the production looks and sounds like shit.

Another problem is, not enough people are honest with the fimmaker...most people just blow smoke up their ass, or will just be polite. I think people should tell it like it is. And it's the job of the filmmaker to really listen and not get defensive.

Cheers.
M1chae1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 08:23 AM   #8
Cracker Funk
Basic Member
 
Cracker Funk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Also noneofyourbusiness
Posts: 9,625
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1chae1 View Post
Another problem is, not enough people are honest with the fimmaker...most people just blow smoke up their ass, or will just be polite. I think people should tell it like it is. And it's the job of the filmmaker to really listen and not get defensive.
I actually prefer that people just be polite -- unless I ask them to be honest. There are people whom I actively seek advice from, and those are the people I want to be brutally honest, and I do my best to listen. As far as getting opinions from "regular" non-filmmaking people is concerned, I think I've become pretty good at figuring out the difference between polite not-entirely-sincere compliments, and enthusiastic sincere compliments. I've gotten enough of both to be able to tell them apart, and I appreciate both.

One way I can recall that some (non-filmmaking) friends basically offered criticism, without actually criticising, was to ask questions, basically along the lines of, "that was an interesting decision -- what was your reasoning for that?" If you're to offer unsolicited critiques, I think it best to be careful with how you phrase your criticisms, and I think a carefully-worded question is a good way of doing that.

If a filmmaker is too stupid to seek advice and honest critiques, then that's their loss, but I think unless you're really close to them (or the production), I think it best to let them choose whom they seek advice from.
Cracker Funk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 08:48 AM   #9
M1chae1
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
M1chae1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,330
That's definitely one way to look at it CF, and I can see how that method may benefit (as we don't want to listen to half-baked bovine's explaining what they didn't like about your movie).

I guess people just work that way...being polite, even if they didn't like it. That's how humans are...but when it comes to filmmaking, if you don't want to hear what someone thinks, don't ask after the premiere, 'Whad'ya think?' Becuase your half-polite question is as insincere as the answer...why even start the insincerity with the question...

Last edited by M1chae1; 01-03-2011 at 08:50 AM.
M1chae1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 09:03 AM   #10
Cracker Funk
Basic Member
 
Cracker Funk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Also noneofyourbusiness
Posts: 9,625
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1chae1 View Post
I guess people just work that way...being polite, even if they didn't like it. That's how humans are...but when it comes to filmmaking, if you don't want to hear what someone thinks, don't ask after the premiere, 'Whad'ya think?' Becuase your half-polite question is as insincere as the answer...why even start the insincerity with the question...
Very true. Come to think of it, I don't ask unless I truly wanna hear. It's really flattering when someone tells me how much they like it, and I can see in their eyes that they really mean it. At the same time, it's flattering for someone to be polite, and tell me that they like it, even if I know that they're just being polite. But it's only flattering if they chose to offer this nicety, unsolicited. If I forced them into it, what's the point?
Cracker Funk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 09:30 AM   #11
VPTurner
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
VPTurner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cypress, Texas
Posts: 1,214
Everyone is a critic and opinionated. I am my own worst critic. I think everything I turn out lately is substandard primarily because I can't give it 100% focus. Too many distractions with the day job and with life in general. But then I let a trusted friend read some material, and I am pleasantly surprised by their reaction.

One thing is for certain. I have yet to produce my best work. And I know it is in me. Practice, practice, practice.

And is there such a thing as polite, honest critique? I suppose there's a difference between "it sucked" and "I didn't care for it". But then there are those who would go the extra step of offering why it didn't work for them, and to me that kind of feedback is invaluable. Don't just tell me you hated it (or loved it). Tell me why you felt that way.

Although I do bite my tongue often. Sometimes you just have to let it stand as "art" and not get overly critical. I don't want to be an obscure artist, so I tend to focus on mass appeal. Others don't think that way. They'd rather make the Indie equivalent of "Piss Christ". Well, more power to them. I may watch it, but don't be shocked if I wince and roll my eyes.

Last edited by VPTurner; 01-03-2011 at 10:51 AM.
VPTurner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 09:50 AM   #12
Gonzo_Entertainment
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Gonzo_Entertainment's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 3,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cracker Funk View Post
I'm my own worst critic. But generally speaking, I like my work. Especially immediately after I finish it. The immediate satisfaction of finishing the project gets me high, and I'm not as critical of my own work, after that high has worn off. As time goes by, I notice more and more faults, but by then, I'm usually cool with accepting those faults as part of the learning process.
I'm the exact opposite. I despise it right after it's finished. I generally think it's the biggest hunk of shit ever made. All I can see are the things I wish I could "fix", and can't. In time I can go back, watch it, and think "ok, this is actually pretty good. It has a lot of good qualities about it".
Gonzo_Entertainment is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 10:12 AM   #13
M1chae1
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
M1chae1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,330
I think if you can throw on one of your pictures a year or two later, and enjoy it as a movie without thinking about the production, you've succeeded on one or more levels.
M1chae1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 10:37 AM   #14
dogfight
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: the netherlands
Posts: 31
Satisfied with my work I am actually most of the time, it's also the process and the fun of doing it.

But I have the selfreflection to see it can be way better. I would be an idiot to think otherwhise.

I think I can get on a level one day to say that I'm proud on my film stuff, but that will take quite a while and I hope to enjoy that process as much as possible.

Again I really think the fun of just doing it is equal to the end result.

mike d.
dogfight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 10:59 AM   #15
Uranium City
Premiere Member
 
Uranium City's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 2,033
I think it's important as artists to never be completely satisfied with our work. That way we'll always continue to grow.
Uranium City is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


©IndieTalk