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Old 01-03-2011, 11:10 AM   #16
Gonzo_Entertainment
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Originally Posted by Uranium City View Post
I think it's important as artists to never be completely satisfied with our work. That way we'll always continue to grow.
The greatest talent any artist can have is never being satisfied, BUT knowing when to put down the brush and say "this one is finished, time to move on". I know a LOT of people still editing the movie they shot two years ago, tweaking, and fixing, and re-doing. They could have learned from it, and taken it forward to the next project, but instead they spin their wheels on the same work they will still be working on two more years from now.
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Old 01-03-2011, 11:30 AM   #17
Uranium City
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BUT knowing when to put down the brush and say "this one is finished, time to move on".
Absolutely important...know where your mistakes lie in previous works, but do them correctly on new projects rather than endlessly tweaking old ones.
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Old 01-03-2011, 11:31 AM   #18
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Amen to that!
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:09 PM   #19
Alcove Audio
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I find myself not being able to judge my own movies...
Being objective about your own work is a really tough gig, but something that can be learned. A lot of it comes with experience and having some years under your belt.

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And yet I still don't think it's very good.
"Ay, there’s the rub!" Once you have been as objective as your age and experience allows you have to figure out why you dislike it, break it down and figure out why you are not satisfied. Did you have enough time to do your project? Since it was for school you have a definite deadline. Obviously you work on a very limited budget; within the time and budgetary constraints did you do the best that you could? How much was completely beyond your control? Did you get your first choice in equipment? Cast? Locations? When working on a limited schedule/budget you quite often have to settle or compromise. Did you compromise in the wrong places/issues?


In my case lack of budget is the reason I am often frustrated with the quality of my work. But it's a bit different for me, however; I'm working under the dictate of someone else's schedule, budget and creative direction (interference? ). For example, even working as hard and as fast as I can, I know I need 200 hours, and I'm given 50; so I prioritize and do what I can; the result is not what I know it could be. Even with enough time I don't ever have the budget I might wish to have; I might wish to custom record sounds rather than use libraries, for example. In those situations I have to judge by how well I did under the imposed time/budgetary constraints. To top it all off, my client has the final word, even if I vehemently disagree with the creative choices.

As many have already said, each project is a learning experience. The important thing is to apply the lessons learned to the next project.
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:39 PM   #20
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It's easy to pit your work against pros also...and that just isn't fair. Budget does not produce a better movie, but it certainly does facilitate many aspects, and allows for much more freedom in all departments.

The trick is to shoot what you can, and shoot it well. If you go military or sci fi, don't even compare your work to Hamburger Hill or Avatar...it just won't be there. The trick is to shoot what you can in your budget level, and make it look and sound great...have a great story...and real actors.

The problem arises when filmmakers can't see what's wrong...or won't see what's wrong. They either know they won't ever be able to do it right, so they work only with short films or pilots, or investor trailers...living the 'life' of a filmmaker, but conveniently never really having to commit...or they are so ignorant because they and have no one telling them their productions suck, that they continue on as usual...never really growing.

I think most of us know what can be improved--as long as we understand what is out of our hand in terms of budget, and what can be handled creatively.

My entire point being...know where you are. Know that you can not (and really should not) try and recreate Avatar. Don't be too hard on yourself, and don't set yourself up for failure.

Cheers.
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Old 01-03-2011, 02:03 PM   #21
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"In my case lack of budget is the reason I am often frustrated with the quality of my work"

99% the cause of my frustrations. "enough" budget doesn't fix everything, but it can fix a lot. For me mainly the compressed timelines. If I can only afford to rent gear for 4 days, we have to shoot it in 4 days. I dream of the luxury of being able to shoot 3 or 4 pages a day instead of 7 or 8 or 9. I certainly buy what
Robert Rodriquez says about lack of budget spurring creativity, but just once I'd love to turn on the money hose and wash away a problem.
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Old 01-03-2011, 04:41 PM   #22
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I take photography and alot of times i find my opinion of my work much lower than my peers, i think you have to realize that when people see something that there 100 percent conscious to fact that someone MADE this rather than catching it on tv or something they respond much more positively and aren't as indifferent to it. So when i judge my work i think along the lines as if i just saw this in the street one day what would i think of it.
Another thing is we tend to know ways it could have been better or different and struggle with whether or final project was the absolute greatest option.
The bottom line is your opinion of it ... though everyone else's is a close second lol.
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Old 01-03-2011, 05:15 PM   #23
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There is always something I like and hate about everything I've ever made. It's like a child in some ways. You don't have a choice but to love some parts of your creation, but that doesn't mean you don't want to strive for perfection or wish your offspring well even when you know it has flaws.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:09 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gonzo_Entertainment View Post
budget doesn't fix everything, but it can fix a lot..............just once I'd love to turn on the money hose and wash away a problem.
Ha ha ha! That's a great quote!
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:21 PM   #25
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No doubt money can fix a lot...you're paying for the talent and resources to create exactly what you want, or fix what is not working. It would be nice to say, 'I would really love an aerial shot here', or 'I'd love a crane shot here'...I'm sure if you had the money, resources, and talent, many filmmakers would opt for more cinematic shots...and boy do those shots work in terms of upping the production value...
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:21 PM   #26
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If you start out with an idea you like, in the end it might not come out anywhere near the way you expected. But, you should still like it. If you didn't like what you started with, you shouldn't have done it in the first place.

Movies or music, the talent is the worst judge of the product while it's being made. That's what friends and test audiences are for.

Always strive to do your best. Down the road, after your project is long in the bag, pop it in the player and see all the things you would have done differently from a whole new perspective.

I like everything I've ever done. They're all full of holes. But, I know it's the best I could do at the time.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:23 PM   #27
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Hum..??? Dont you have to balance self loathing with the ability to self market? If you walk around saying I suck, I suck, I suck.. well then no matter how good you are, by your own definition you still suck. Who wants to work with someone who doubts their own abilities? If you don't know this already, I tell you a secret.. two secrets in fact..

  1. Half of life is just showing up!
  2. Most people are winging it!


No excuses!

So by just showing up and making a movie, your already exceptional!

In counter point. The lack of growth, is retardation.


You can admit that the film you did a while back was crap, but this new project, the one your working on NOW.. this film is\will be brilliant! Its Awesome, its the best darn movie ever!
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:38 PM   #28
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Yes, and perhaps it's best to pick one ore two things to improve with future projects...don't overwhelm yourself. Start with a solid script (always) and pick a production aspect you want to definitely improve...noticeably.
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Old 01-03-2011, 08:52 PM   #29
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I don't know if I'm even qualified to respond to this question [that may give you some insight to what kind of answer I'm giving. haha]. personally, I rarely enjoy my work. because like most artists, it never lives up to my original vision. I can't help but wince throughout most of one of my little short films, just so horrible...but sometimes, on rare occasions, there's a project where I can actually sit back and watch without having to look away or shake my head. it's really a question that can have a billion answers, which is fantastic.

Last edited by JaredKowis; 01-04-2011 at 02:13 AM. Reason: minor typo
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:25 PM   #30
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I'm never "happy" with my work, I always think I can do it better and that keeps me moving forward. I have films posted online and they receive some horrendous feedback, but I know them for what they are and they are worse than most of the comments... They were the best I was able to produce at the time with the tools and knowledge I had then... I wasn't happy with them then and that made me want to do better next time.

Every project we finish, we tear apart in a screening for a few select folks, then we choose the worst offender to work on the next film... we also choose the parts that work well and try to repeat those successes - we even go so far as to try to figure out WHY they work or don't... but brutally honest about our work at all times in private.

In our films, the director is always at fault for all of the failures as it's their job to make sure we get the right footage and make the right decisions to make a GREAT film. My last couple, I'm actually pretty happy with. Better takes, better set/costume/makeup, better editing, better effects, better sound, etc. Better story telling as well.

Still room for improvement, always will be!
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