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Old 02-15-2018, 04:07 AM   #31
Feutus Lapdance
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Time for the saddest song in the world?

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Old 11-09-2018, 07:07 AM   #32
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I think as far as storytelling goes music is one of the most visual arts . (In some scenarios they even surpass movies and books ).

But I don't think there is ( or there will ever be ) specific tips and tricks on how and when to use the music in movies. Unlike movies, music can not be dissected into pieces for examination.Music is an extremely intuitive form of art. Therefore they should be used in an intuitive way too. That's probably the only rule you'll ever need when you want to use music in movies.

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Old 11-09-2018, 10:14 AM   #33
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I think as far as storytelling goes music is one of the most visual arts .
Ah, no… Music is a sonic/aural art - you don't see it at all. Yes, sound and visuals an complement each other, but you can close your eyes and still experience music. It's almost impossible to "close" your ears.


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But I don't think there is ( or there will ever be ) specific tips and tricks on how and when to use the music in movies.
Basics - music accents action and supports emotion. The rest is entirely subjective.


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Unlike movies, music can not be dissected into pieces for examination.
Sorry, but music can be broken down into its component parts. That was the whole point of music school, studying how music was constructed/composed. There are very distinct rules for most genres of music - tonality/instrumentation, compositional rules, etc. As an example, Baroque music uses traditional/classical European instruments (strings, brass, woodwinds, keyboards [harpsichord & organ] and some percussion) and you cannot use parallel fifths. It is even broken into early, middle and late eras. All genres of music have distinctive characteristics which can be categorized/systematized.
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Old 11-09-2018, 10:32 AM   #34
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Ah, no… Music is a sonic/aural art - you don't see it at all. Yes, sound and visuals an complement each other, but you can close your eyes and still experience music. It's almost impossible to "close" your ears.
Whenever you listen to music you visualize certain things. That's what I meant by visual art.


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Sorry, but music can be broken down into its component parts. That was the whole point of music school, studying how music was constructed/composed. There are very distinct rules for most genres of music - tonality/instrumentation, compositional rules, etc. As an example, Baroque music uses traditional/classical European instruments (strings, brass, woodwinds, keyboards [harpsichord & organ] and some percussion) and you cannot use parallel fifths. It is even broken into early, middle and late eras. All genres of music have distinctive characteristics which can be categorized/systematized.
Of course all musics can be deconstructed and of course you can categorize musics by deconstructing their components. I'm talking about the aesthetic value of music. no one evaluates the worth of a certain piece by scrutinizing layers of instruments and tones. A music either gets you or it doesn't. as simple as that. Even some false tones can sometimes be conceived as beautiful.

And for emotions, there is no definitive answer what kinds of musics relate to certain emotions. For example, romantic songs can be used to portray violence ,... . You may think a score will instigate a certain specific emotion in the audience, where in reality, maybe only a handful of the audience will get the same vibe from the score as you did. The extreme intuitive nature of music disables us from pin pointing it's AESTHETIC rules. Therefore when it comes to using music in movies the best way to go with it is your intuition.

Last edited by pedramyz; 11-09-2018 at 10:38 AM.
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Old 11-09-2018, 12:47 PM   #35
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The extreme intuitive nature of music disables us from pin pointing it's AESTHETIC rules.
This is a valid point. An analogy to architecture works quite well. There are a LOT of rules and conventions about writing music, and they're important (like the structure of a building). But ultimately, what matters more than the building not falling over is how it feels/works. And that can't be quantified as easily.

I remember reading a quote about Hitchcock, saying he didn't want music whenever we see the boat in "Lifeboat" - because there's no place for an orchestra in the middle of the ocean. To which the composer replied: "Where's the camera?" ---> A camera compels us to look a certain way, music compels us to feel a certain way. Music and acting have gone hand in hand since ancient Greece at least, I don't think that's going to change.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:30 PM   #36
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I remember reading a quote about Hitchcock, saying he didn't want music whenever we see the boat in "Lifeboat" - because there's no place for an orchestra in the middle of the ocean. To which the composer replied: "Where's the camera?"
Epic response! Love it.
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