Home Your Ad Here

Go Back   IndieTalk - Indie Film Forum > Making The Film > Filmmaking Misc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-20-2007, 02:08 PM   #16
Spatula
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Spatula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2,000
We did the same thing (plastic tube with corn-syrup blood solution) for our feature film, Macbeth 3000. We ran it through a dummy and out the neck, so when I (macduff) chopped off Bill's (Macbeth) head, a NICe spurt of blood popped out. We had a guy just blowing hard. I think it'll work just fine. Go for it!

Don't worry about a "storage device" though- just get a long tube, and have it curve, so the blood sits at the bottom of a "J" shape inside the rug, and the other end is just below the slit facing up.
Spatula is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today   #1A
film guy
Basic Member
 
Posts: 17

 
Old 04-20-2007, 02:55 PM   #17
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
we tried something like that on death bed...the blood we used was too thick to blow through...make sure you test before using it on set, you'll be happier and not have to make up something on the spot like we did (ours ended up over the top).
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2007, 02:43 AM   #18
DallasDKnight
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 17
I start production this Thursday on my short film. Any last minute advice or general tips are very much appreciated! Things you wish you knew when you did your first short film, but learned the hard way - so I don't have to.

We will be editing with Final Cut Pro.

We are shooting on an XL1.

Audio will be done with - Azden SGM-1X, ProStudioTools SM420, ProStudioTools BP1069.

I still need to buy my lighting kit, please make suggestions! There is a Vistek where I live if you want to be very specific and helpful. I don't think I want to pay to ship a lighting kit to me. I have about 1000 dollars to spend on one but it could be more if the value will be seen on the final product, and my future films to come. I am considering this an investment.

Thanks everyone again I appreciate all your help so far.

-Dallas
DallasDKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2007, 07:11 AM   #19
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
Give yourself more time on set than you think you'll need...it'll be better to be ahead of schedule than behind...rushing will lead to mistakes. Make a schedule per day...this scene has to be done today, this one this day. Stick to it aggressively!
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 04:09 PM   #20
DallasDKnight
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 17
Knightly maybe you can help the new guy out some more.

Is there an ideal Iris setting for my camera, or one you would suggest? Like if I am controlling the light a lot, would I rather have the iris open or closed? This is all indoors, I am going to have lots of lights to manipulate it - should I try and always keep the iris a certain size for consistancy in the image?

Also frame rate? What is the automatic setting for it on manual? Is it going to be fine that way? Sorry just nervous I will make an amateur mistake that will ruin the whole project.
DallasDKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 05:49 PM   #21
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
iris ... wide open will give you shallower depth of field, so it'll take less light, but if you're limited on what kinds of lights you have, get a couple of different Neutral Density "ND" filters that are lighter than what your camera comes with (if it comes with them built in). That way you can afford to slightly overlight and then ND it down afterwards. I like to use a polarizer as well (circular if you use auto focus at all). The other thing that is worthwhile to learn is the "Inverse Square Law". Basically it states that as you move a light away from something it gets dimmer So to control the amount of light without a dimmer, move it farther away from the subject...it'll spread out wider as well, so you may have to turn it to prevent spill. Imagine that every light with a reflector casts a cone out from the front of it ... the edges of these cones goes slightly darker as it approaches the part of the cone that no longer throws light (falloff area). Lighting with the falloff allows you to cotrol spill without barndoors I have tons more, some based on the physics of light studies that I've done and others based on experience.

Play alot with the camera and lights...figure out what works by experimenting. Put your key light x feet away from your subject, see how it looks in the camera, move it, see what that does. Put your fill light x*2 feet away for a 4:1 lighting ratio (inverse square law will give you these numbers).
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 06:00 PM   #22
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
sorry, missed the other questions in my flurry of typing:

Frame rate, set it to frame mode in the menus (30p). 60i is the default and will give you "combed" vertical edges where there is motion forcing you to deinterlace and lose 50% of your resolution. Shoot 4x3, but turn on your 16x9 guides in the viewfinder for framing. This will allow you the option to crop later if you want to.

Shutter speed 1/60th will look the most familiar. Faster shutter (bigger bottom numbers) will get you the "Private Ryan" beach look, slower shutter will get you the "Just passing through before passing out at the party" look.

As far as framing goes, make sure to get different framings while you're shooting, since you control the lighting, I'm assuming you control the actors (kinda) as well. Go through each scene a couple of times with different framings, from wide to establish the actors' relationship to one another (break the rule to hide the relationship), to mids to get emotionally neutral views of the characters to closeups to get very intimate shots of the subjects...to XCU to show extreme empathy or involvement on the part of the audience.

For SD Digital, remember to get into the mids and closeups faster than you would on film to hide the lack of resolution form the audience. Shooting with the camera farther back and zoomed in to frame will get some blurring in the background. This is a good thing, it helps to hide the digital nature as well by eliminating sharp contrasty edges in the backgrounds and focusing more attention on the foreground. In fact you should probably be running at just shy of full zoom (variation to account for the different framings) almost always unless you specifically want a long depth of field for your shot or specifically want to show something in the background to the audience at its real size in relation to the subject.

Ask more pointed questions, I'll cough out more info.
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2007, 09:50 PM   #23
DallasDKnight
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 17
Awesome!

I've got my actors.

I've got my script.

I've got my set.

I've got my shotgun mic working.

I'm going to be buying my light kit soon and I have a couple of questions.

How many watts is one of my normal light plugs in the wall going to hold? I only have one panel in my basement that has two sockets. But I have two panels upstairs close enough that could give me 4 sockets with the use of extension cords. How many watts do you think one socket will hold? If that makes any sense.

Also do flouresent lights look nice on digital video? If I bought four flouresent lights with diffusers from a camera store, would that work for my film?

Thanks.

-D
DallasDKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2007, 09:56 PM   #24
John@Bophe
Basic Member
 
John@Bophe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Norristown, PA
Posts: 1,839
Just in case you don't any direct responses here -- Knightly has a lot of great lighting tips already posted on the site. Try using the forum search feature (see the top menu).
John@Bophe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2007, 10:40 PM   #25
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
thanks john...but, lighting...knightly sniffs around...I smell lighting questions

http://ebtx.com/mech/ampvolt.htm

watts=volts x amps

ergo, amps = watts / volts

Normal household circuit is 110, normal household circuit is 15 - 20 amps (check the circuit box). Depending on where your location is , it could be a 220 installation, amperage would be different there...again, check the circuit box.

80% is safe tolerance for a circuit...90% is pushing it. Don't ever hit 100%, you'll have nothing but headaches.

Bring lots of long extension cords so you can draw from multiple circuits if need be.

Flourescent lights look fabulous on camera...see everything I've done...except streamcavejimdave (who named that thing) which was all sunlit. You'll want to white balance to the lights using a white card...and possibly add some minus green gel (magenta, 1/2 should do ...roscoe makes great gels) to the lights (gets rid of the green spike in the flourescent world, it's normal there). I didn't gel and used preset indoor WB in "Scare Tactics", so the footage turned out slightly yellow from the green and the reds mixing. I'm using GE Softwhite Spiral Compact Flourescents (CFL's). $5/bulb...can't complain with those prices. I can put 3 of them on my car with an inverter to do location outdoor lighting...only one worklight though
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2007, 01:15 AM   #26
Solovey
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 4
Hi Dallas:

I can't offer help with the film aspect of your project but would like to offer my assistance with any sound design, composition, SFX, or Foley for you. Let me know if you are interested.

Richard
Solovey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2007, 01:51 AM   #27
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
Welcome Solovey...way to start out your tenure here Diggin' right in!
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2007, 06:24 AM   #28
VPTurner
Premiere Member
 
VPTurner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cypress, Texas
Posts: 1,214
I actually have a question (or questions) relevent to this discussion. I finally watched my "Ultimate Guide to the XL1s" a couple of times so I know the camera pretty well now (including what I was doing wrong with the audio). knightly, you recommend turning on the 16:9 guides in 4:3 mode. Why this method and not anamorphic (squeezed)? I was planning on using the 16:9 mode and monitoring the framing using an external LCD screen so I don't lose any of the resolution through cropping. Even the host of the "Guide" mentions this is not the best method. In your experience, why the guides and not the "squeeze"? Incidentally, if Dallas has an XL1 and not the XL1s, I don't think he has the guides. He only has the squeeze. I'm pretty sure the guides were new to the XL1s.

On other forums, 60i was the recommended shooting method because even shooting in frame mode the data is still stored on the media as interlaced since it's NTSC. Frame Mode supposedly just simulates the appearance of progressive through software in the camera. With this in mind, you would still need to deinterlace after capture and you are at the mercy of the camera to properly interpret what you are shooting. I planned to shoot 60i and use software (e.g. DV Film Maker) in post to get the film look. Is it really preferred to shoot 30p?

Thanks.

BTW, this is where I got the info about shooting interlaced and not progressive:

http://www.dvfilm.com/fx1/

Even though this references HD material, I thought it might also be relevent to SD. Perhaps it is just the algorithms that the software uses where it prefers 50i or 60i input.

--Vince

Last edited by VPTurner; 06-01-2007 at 06:35 AM.
VPTurner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2007, 08:38 AM   #29
knightly
Basic Member
 
knightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 8,176
16x9 in the XL1s crops anyway, the host of the video is misinformed...the XL2 is the first Canon prosumer to not crop its 16x9. You can get an anamorphic adaptor for the front of the lens to use the whole 4x3 area to store a optically (not digitally) squeezed image, which can be unsqueezed with the click of a button in post...33% resolution horizontal resolution gain over setting the 16x9 option in the camera.

Interlaced vs. Progressive:

The issue isn't with storage, it's with motion of light over time. In interlaced, you are taking 1/60th of a second time slices and putting them together odd lines, then even lines. If there is any horizontal motion between those timeslices (i.e. panning or subject moving their body at all, wind in the trees), you *will* see the combing effect. You can reduce this in post by throwing away half of your image through deinterlacing.

With progressive (frame), the timeslice is a 1/30th of a second (NTSC - XL1s)...the digital magic that happens is that the even fields' information is stored in a buffer from the previous 1/60th of a second (the same one that the odd fields are from) and then stored to the next field write to tape. What you end up with is the odds drawing on screen, then the evens and persistance of vision (which is used to blend the fields in our eyes with interlaced) stiches the two together. Until you get to your editing where you can use the 2:3 pulldown to make it real progressive.

Since you're going for the "Film Look" (which is a term I've grown to dislike since it means different things to different people). Shoot progressive (frame) to get the real life motion that a film camera would grab. This is one of the main things that gives away video vs. film...30p or 24p is a negligible step and having people rant about 24p is somewhat annoying, the real reason they're so happy about the aesthetic is that it's progressive rather than interlaced. People who do nothing but stare at footage all day (myself included) can tell the difference between 30 and 24, but the rest of the audience won't care. Interlaced combing, however, is painfully obvious...and in the XL1s, you throw away less information shooting frame mode than shooting interlaced.

The only reasons I would recommend you shoot interlaced is if you are printing to film and your conversion house recommends it, if you want a segment that looks like a news cast or if you intend to turn the footage into slow motion using the alternating fields as separate frames through a field > frame conversion with deinterrlacing (I wrote a script once and have footage posted somewhere).

so 4x3 with guides, and 30p unless you have an artistic reson to shoot 60i. The name of the game is to keep as many pixels represented in the final product as possible with SD Video. Light well and expose properly, consider every piece of what goes into each frame and you will get the film look without having to spend the extra time post processing the footage.
knightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2007, 11:59 AM   #30
DallasDKnight
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 17
Knightly you have been so helpful and prompt in helping with my film (and everyone else has been very helpful as well) I think a thank-you credit at the end of my film is going to be nessicary.
DallasDKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


©IndieTalk