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Old 06-28-2008, 09:02 AM   #1
cc101
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Is there a best way to promote composing?

If an artist/composer is known, has a lengthy body of work and trackable success, how do they begin the process of networking their talents and services in film score and composing? Aside from this site, are there areas where someone can/should post and promote? Specific avenues that film makers go to for original work from accomplished and legitimate composers?

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Last edited by cc101; 06-28-2008 at 09:36 AM.
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Old 06-28-2008, 05:08 PM   #2
oakstreetphotovideo
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You can start here, but this post probably belongs in the classifieds.

Doug
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Old 06-28-2008, 05:11 PM   #3
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p.s. I just noticed that you made 4 posts on this forum today, all promoting your service. You might be overdoing it just a little. Protocol here is to post this sort of thing in the classifieds and to refrain from crossposting.

Welcome to IndieTalk, anyway. Doug
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:29 PM   #4
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forums, myspace, facebook (other sites like that). Posting here is a good start. Same as with filmmaking, find like minded individuals in your area and online and talk about your projects and theories as you learn/develop them. Be excited about it! Perhaps look at the 48hour projects in your area and find a team website with contact info offering your services. You'll start by working for free, but eventually, you can find a way into the industry once you've studied it's structure and learned how it works for professionals.

Doug is right though, make sure you read and follow the rules and etiquette of the place you are posting so you can not offend the people you're trying to reach, that's counter-productive to your goals.
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Old 06-28-2008, 08:48 PM   #5
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Links removed. You have advertised in another thread already in the correct forum.
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Old 06-28-2008, 09:55 PM   #6
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Wow. You guys are supremely serious about policing this message board - sorry for cross posting and thanks to those of you who were so gracious to offer input (both here and privately). Sometimes I think the ego prevents anyone from ever progressing...

In the 20+ years I have been an agent/manager for emerging artists, I seem to always find a community of very amazing people, but I have to go through alot of thick, sticky and dangerous territory before I end up where I'm supposed to begin.
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Old 06-28-2008, 10:01 PM   #7
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So I'm confused, "knightly" and "indietalk" both have links and/or a banner ad at the closing of all their posts and repiies - I need to upgrade to do that, correct?

In response to the message regarding MySpace, Facebook and such, we have done that as this artist has a pretty amazing following for his solo as well as group CD's so we're good to go there. Just wanted specific film maker avenues to go to connect with those writers and directors looking for original compositions for their films. The 48hour projects you mentioned, is that something I would Google? My apologies for not having the industry terminology down.
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Old 06-28-2008, 11:44 PM   #8
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... have links and/or a banner ad at the closing of all their posts and repiies - I need to upgrade to do that, correct?
Yes. It is a feature reserved for premiere members -- the ability to customize a signature that automatically appears after every post you make. It can include just your name, or a link, or a banner, or all three.

We hope this doesn't deter you from joining in the many discussions on this site. And yes, we do take the moderation role seriously. It is what keeps this site very civil and respectful towards others. Once you get involved, you'll find it's the best of its kind.
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Old 06-29-2008, 11:36 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by cc101 View Post
Wow. You guys are supremely serious about policing this message board
We sure are. It makes this messageboard a very good one. Hang around for
a while, join in on discussions and you'll soon understand why the mods are
so serious.

I'm a director and producer who very often looks for a composer. I have
never used an online site to find one. I rely on referrals. The specific avenues
are post production companies, other producers and members of the crew.

I see many posts and promotions on messageboards and I get notices on
MySpace and Facebook. Once in a while I have the time to listen, but I
prefer a referral.

One of my longest standing relationships with a composer is a guy who
was the recordist on a movie I directed. He agreed to do all the post audio
for a greatly reduced rate if I would hire him to compose the score.

Often the post production mixer will know composers. I've found a few
that way.

If a composer spends time on a messageboard, entering into discussions,
offering advice, helping out others I would be inclined to pay more attention.
Most composers come to boards, post a notice and that's it. The relationship
between a director and the composer needs to be a close one - creative, trust,
compromise and a little volatile as times. I don't get any understanding of the
person from one messageboard notice and listening to tracks.
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Old 06-29-2008, 09:38 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by directorik View Post
If a composer spends time on a messageboard, entering into discussions,
offering advice, helping out others I would be inclined to pay more attention.
Most composers come to boards, post a notice and that's it. The relationship
between a director and the composer needs to be a close one - creative, trust,
compromise and a little volatile as times. I don't get any understanding of the
person from one messageboard notice and listening to tracks.
I've never thought this out fully, but is precisely the reason I've used people I know for scoring. There's been lots of offers to do composing here, but I've never followed them up as I had people I knew from other places make the same offer whom I know take criticism well and work well under pressure (most of what we do is timed competitions).

http://www.48hourfilm.com/ is the link to the 48 hour film project. You'll usually end up with about a half an hour to compose, but it's a fun ride
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:38 AM   #11
cc101
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Originally Posted by directorik View Post
We sure are. It makes this messageboard a very good one. Hang around for
a while, join in on discussions and you'll soon understand why the mods are
so serious.

I'm a director and producer who very often looks for a composer. I have
never used an online site to find one. I rely on referrals. The specific avenues
are post production companies, other producers and members of the crew.

I see many posts and promotions on messageboards and I get notices on
MySpace and Facebook. Once in a while I have the time to listen, but I
prefer a referral.

One of my longest standing relationships with a composer is a guy who
was the recordist on a movie I directed. He agreed to do all the post audio
for a greatly reduced rate if I would hire him to compose the score.

Often the post production mixer will know composers. I've found a few
that way.

If a composer spends time on a messageboard, entering into discussions,
offering advice, helping out others I would be inclined to pay more attention.
Most composers come to boards, post a notice and that's it. The relationship
between a director and the composer needs to be a close one - creative, trust,
compromise and a little volatile as times. I don't get any understanding of the
person from one messageboard notice and listening to tracks.
So this confirms just about everything I've known in the music industry really does transfer to film as well; if you don't know someone, who knows someone who knows someone, your chances are SO painfully slim... this artist, Bryan Baker, has done a body of work at only 22 to intimidate most other musicians (which can be another challenge in and of itself to get him 'out there'); trick is, to intern with a known score composer to intern with a recordist, etc., takes times and this particular individual tours 6-7 months out of the year preforming so that grunt-labor avenue (no negativity attached to that btw) isn't an option and quite frankly, would be absurd for him to do given who he is already. He really wants to do film composing is the thing so I guess I need to get more creative with how and where I market his skills... your input however is so valuable and greatly appreciated!
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:50 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by knightly View Post
I've never thought this out fully, but is precisely the reason I've used people I know for scoring. There's been lots of offers to do composing here, but I've never followed them up as I had people I knew from other places make the same offer whom I know take criticism well and work well under pressure (most of what we do is timed competitions).

http://www.48hourfilm.com/ is the link to the 48 hour film project. You'll usually end up with about a half an hour to compose, but it's a fun ride
I'll most certainly look into the 48 hour film site Knightly, thank you. Bryan has been applauded for his militant attention to detail and by virtue of his age, and to know he's been performing and recording as a band leader is a testament to his dedication and appreciation for "doing the work" ethic that is SO supremely lacking in the industry. Somehow this generation of young talent has taken the onslaught of reality TV, talent competitions and come to the conclusion that gear and money are all one needs to succeed in the Arts. Sadly, by the simple proof that there is so much garbage being produced is somewhat truth that if you have enough money, you will "make it" and talent or a gift for something really needn't apply. The "business" is, for an artist like Bryan, an illusion really, so many individuals posing as someone because who they have to connect to or impress is also posing for someone else and the authenticity of the matter, everyone just dropping the pseudo-personalities and just say "hey that guys great, let's try him out" or, you know what Man, I'm struggling just like you, let's see how we can be more impressive as a team" etc, etc, just doesn't happen due to the fact that if the BS of it all were dropped, there would a whole lotta' people out there tying nooses with the reality that they are all no further ahead, just as hungry and pulling at straws as the next guy.

I'm completely passionate about the artist's I represent and I have devote a lifetime of energy and funds to support and empower the ones that really, really are incredibly gifted and unique - I have to continue to reinvent how I do what I do and this message board has supplied me with some solid info and I'm grateful for that.
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Old 06-30-2008, 09:06 AM   #13
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So this confirms just about everything I've known in the music industry really does transfer to film as well; if you don't know someone, who knows someone who knows someone, your chances are SO painfully slim
I don't agree with that. Sure, it doesn't hurt to know people, and if you do, you could still be mediocre or worse and even break into the business. But if you don't know anyone, put yourself on the inside track by making your talent and craft stand out. Make yourself so good, professionals can't say no.

The business is run by people who want to make money. If you're talented and can help them do that, you'll get a shot. The thing is, most people who never make it assume they are good enough already, when 99% of them aren't. They overestimate their abilities, get rejected, and then blame it on not knowing anyone. They just need to get better. Edison got his light bulb to work after more than 100 attempts...not because he thought his first attempt or first 100 attempts were good enough and nature just didn't recognize his genius, he got it right after he kept doing it over and over until his design made the grade.

If you've already got a credible track record, maybe you are just pursuing the wrong people. Go after what you want, but get you work to the right people who are interested in it.

Last edited by Jijenji; 06-30-2008 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:41 AM   #14
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I don't agree with that. Sure, it doesn't hurt to know people, and if you do, you could still be mediocre or worse and even break into the business. But if you don't know anyone, put yourself on the inside track by making your talent and craft stand out. Make yourself so good, professionals can't say no.

The business is run by people who want to make money. If you're talented and can help them do that, you'll get a shot. The thing is, most people who never make it assume they are good enough already, when 99% of them aren't. They overestimate their abilities, get rejected, and then blame it on not knowing anyone. They just need to get better. Edison got his light bulb to work after more than 100 attempts...not because he thought his first attempt or first 100 attempts were good enough and nature just didn't recognize his genius, he got it right after he kept doing it over and over until his design made the grade.

If you've already got a credible track record, maybe you are just pursuing the wrong people. Go after what you want, but get you work to the right people who are interested in it.

All good input and I agree, however talent and drive and relentless pursuit aren't all it takes; one does have to have connects and by and large the money to support and sustain (which is where So many gifted artists are never heard or seen due to lack of funding). Your comment, "...go after what you want, but get your work to teh right people" is exactly why I posted on the board in the first place; I'm searching for this artist, the "people" to get his work in front of. Like I've written, he's acclaimed internationally on various level as a performer (I'd leave his web address here but fear I'd be nailed for doing so - I think you can find it if you're interested) however intrinsically feels most creative when he is composing and arranging. Also, I don't subscribe to the belief that someone has to pine away, earn their stripes, pay dues... in order to be successful - if you're good, credibly good, can get your work in the market, you will succeed.

Oh, and as far as I know from my own reading, Edison actually pilfered and stole the light bulb concepts then bought the rights to everything he's every had his name attached to - thereby reaffirming my comments that the ones with the talent and drive, without the money, can most certainly be left behind.
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Old 06-30-2008, 11:25 AM   #15
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So this confirms just about everything I've known in the music industry really does transfer to film as well; if you don't know someone, who knows someone who knows someone, your chances are SO painfully slim... this artist, Bryan Baker, has done a body of work at only 22 to intimidate most other musicians
People are only human. We love to be with people we know and are
comfortable with. We love to help people we know. We love to work
with people we like. Talent isnít the end all of a relationship. If Mr.
Baker was an unprofessional, unfriendly musician with a poor work
ethic and all his current talent, you wouldn't rep him, would you? The
personal is a huge part of why you rep this musician.

That is no different than why a producer hires one.

You asked how to begin the process of networking. The primary
component of networking in making contact with people on a
personal level. You need to know someone, you need to know a lot
of people. This isnít a bad thing. Networking, getting to know
people, working with a lot of different people is a great way to
change the chances from SO painfully slim to huge.

And I gotta say, when looking for a composer Iím not looking for
someone who intimidates most other musicians. thatís not a plus
for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cc101 View Post
Also, I don't subscribe to the belief that someone has to pine away, earn their stripes, pay dues... in order to be successful - if you're good, credibly good, can get your work in the market, you will succeed.
This is interesting.

Do you know any successful composer who didn't pine away, earn
their stripes and pay their dues before they became successful?
How about any successful person? Do you know a lot of successful
people in any business that didnít pay their dues and earn their stripes?

I think it's great that you are so passionate about your clients.
I hope as you reinvent how you promote your clients you
encourage them to make the personal contacts producers really
want.

Iím much mote likely to hire a composer when I hear another
producer tell me how great they were to work with, than a manager
telling me to check a website.

Makes it a LOT tougher doesnít it?
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