Home

Go Back   IndieTalk - Indie Film Forum > Making The Film > Music

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-30-2008, 01:23 PM   #16
oakstreetphotovideo
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Jacksonville NC
Posts: 979
In this particular area, I'm nobody and I know nothing, so take this as a suggestion from the peanut gallery. I recently attended a presentation by the director of "One Tree Hill". He talked about how they ended each episode with a full length music track, and that he had licensed tracks from unknown artists who subsequently sold 20,000 records. My thought is that if you could find the right person on the episodic series and get them to use one of your client's tracks, it could get him the exposure that he would need in the television/movie business.

Just a thought.

Doug
oakstreetphotovideo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today   #1A
film guy
Basic Member
 
Posts: 17

 
Old 07-05-2008, 09:30 AM   #17
cc101
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Coast
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by directorik View Post
People are only human. We love to be with people we know and are
comfortable with. We love to help people we know. We love to work
with people we like. Talent isnít the end all of a relationship. If Mr.
Baker was an unprofessional, unfriendly musician with a poor work
ethic and all his current talent, you wouldn't rep him, would you? The
personal is a huge part of why you rep this musician.

That is no different than why a producer hires one.

You asked how to begin the process of networking. The primary
component of networking in making contact with people on a
personal level. You need to know someone, you need to know a lot
of people. This isnít a bad thing. Networking, getting to know
people, working with a lot of different people is a great way to
change the chances from SO painfully slim to huge.

And I gotta say, when looking for a composer Iím not looking for
someone who intimidates most other musicians. thatís not a plus
for me.


This is interesting.

Do you know any successful composer who didn't pine away, earn
their stripes and pay their dues before they became successful?
How about any successful person? Do you know a lot of successful
people in any business that didnít pay their dues and earn their stripes?

I think it's great that you are so passionate about your clients.
I hope as you reinvent how you promote your clients you
encourage them to make the personal contacts producers really
want.

Iím much mote likely to hire a composer when I hear another
producer tell me how great they were to work with, than a manager
telling me to check a website.

Makes it a LOT tougher doesnít it?

Thank you for all the comments, this is extremely valuable input. Yes, I can say that I do know many in the film and music industry especially, that have "made it" without paying alot of dues... what they had were close contacts that pushed the process further and quicker than any due paying - I guess my plan is to find those producers and start the process this way - if I can locate "the one" willing to give this composer the opportunity to do the good work that he can do, then that producer will be encouraged to pass along Bryan as an artist to work with and so the process goes....

Bryan Baker isn't interested in doing anything other than quality work, and his sound is so unique that the niche his playing fits in by virtue of who he is, will dictate the time and patience required to secure a lifetime of working successfully. I'm at least fortunate that this is a client that isn't eager to "be famous" as much as he's hellbent on being good, being known for being good - it just so happens that he's exceptionally good (the quotes I have from legendary performers is crazy for a guy this young) and to wait for the sake of waiting seems odd to me. How is it that someone this gifted needs to pay dues when all along the way, the time spent doing so is time lost in sharing what he has?

So my project now is to find the producers for Bryan and let him take it from there for now.

Thanks again, I do appreciate the feedback, really.
cc101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2008, 09:35 AM   #18
cc101
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Coast
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oakstreetphotovideo View Post
In this particular area, I'm nobody and I know nothing, so take this as a suggestion from the peanut gallery. I recently attended a presentation by the director of "One Tree Hill". He talked about how they ended each episode with a full length music track, and that he had licensed tracks from unknown artists who subsequently sold 20,000 records. My thought is that if you could find the right person on the episodic series and get them to use one of your client's tracks, it could get him the exposure that he would need in the television/movie business.

Just a thought.

Doug
Ah Ha! My thoughts exactly Doug, now how to go about this.... I'm thinking I can research who pulls tunes for episodes; is it the producer's assist? Does that come from editing? I'm not hip to the point person in that area but you're right where my heads been for the past week. I've also got a new EP we're recording over the weekend as a label in the UK is interested in Bryan's work - ah, the juggling - thank goodness the only client in this genre is Bryan or I'd be looped for sure.
cc101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2008, 08:20 AM   #19
Charles@Bophe
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Charles@Bophe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Glenside, PA
Posts: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc101 View Post
Ah Ha! My thoughts exactly Doug, now how to go about this....

You may want look at http://www.taxi.com/ for TV and film placement. Read about this service. They may be able to help you and your artist.

Best of luck!

--Charles
Charles@Bophe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2008, 09:42 AM   #20
clive
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
clive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 2,436
Hi,

I've been away for the last couple of weeks, so I've not had a chance to respond to this thread.

Firstly, in general I'd agree with Rik that I tend to work with people I know... and that that is common practice in this industry.

However, with that said, I've made good, serious business connections here on this board... but not overnight. Like any community it takes time to get to know people... and also to make judgments about whether they are the kind of people you'd want to work with.

In terms of music... I spent a lot of money on music on my last feature project (about $30,000 + $30,000 in deferments) and I found the composer online via his agency.

What drew me to that agency was the quality of the other work these guys were getting. In the end it was a combination of the composer's show reel, his prior experience of working on large projects and the conversation we had about how we wanted to work, that convinced me he was the right guy for the job.

In the end I chose him over a close personal friend who would have done the job for a fraction of the price, which was a though call... but I also believe that the good soundtrack adds a massive amount in terms of production value and a bad one does the opposite.

The other factor that worked for our guy was his ability to access incredible live musicians, within the budget we set him.

I am going to email you directly, because I do have some ideas about ways of establishing a link between new composers and the rest of the industry.

Hope this helps
clive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 02:51 PM   #21
Timothy S. Klugh
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grove City, Ohio, USA
Posts: 3
Also interested...

I am interested in learning the exact same thing. I have been writing music for years. I have wrote music for theatre productions, but I want to expand to films now.

Timothy S. Klugh
Grove City, Ohio, USA
Timothy S. Klugh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2009, 06:54 PM   #22
benbrockett
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: London
Posts: 2
Hi it's been interesting reading this thread. I am currently finishing my degree and am looking to get as much experience as possible. I looked at the 48 hour project site and it looks really exciting, thanks for the tip!

As far as the whether you have to have connections or not argument goes I generally feel that connections are best made in a non commital manner. For example when I have approached people making films I have asked if I can have access to the film as a practice exercise. That way I get to practice and get feedback and people will also look at my work without feeling they have a commitment to use anything that I produce. I find a lot of film makers are happy to have alternative music for their work even if they have no intention of using it.
benbrockett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2009, 09:40 AM   #23
BrianJ
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 5
www.thedoorpost.com
BrianJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2009, 04:31 AM   #24
RobertAlexander
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 5
Hi everyone, as someone who knows a little about high level agencies and music soundtracks, I thought Id offer my two cents. Composers need to demonstrate 3 things to filmmakers-

1)the ability to add artistic value to a production through music-this goes beyond making money-you have to meet the filmmaking teams artistic vision for the project-always remember that a film is someones baby.

2)the ability to earn the trust and confidence of the filmmaking team so that they know that their investment in your music will assist them in meeting their financial goals for the film-remember, when they purchase music-it is an investment-a calculated risk-that your music will add value to the film that wasn't there before-value that is worth paying for-this value takes a lot of time and experience composing to build up-many composers make the mistake of thinking that they are worth more than they are, or capable of scoring projects that are simply beyond their current scope. That is okay, everyone has to start somewhere, but it takes time to get there. Value is something that most of the time has to be earned and built-credits and past working relationships do this but it is also a general mindset and an approach to conducting business that separates the amateur from the professional.

3)Professionalism-credits and past working relationships do more than show a composer the value of their investment-it shows your dedication to your craft and that in turn demonstrates your commitment to produce great music, meet deadlines and be able to create music that will sound great and work with the production and thats the bottom line.

So, my best tip for composers is to keep shooting high, but set attainable goals and you will get where your hoping to go. Remember as well that just because your music is great, that still doesn't mean you have the necessary career experience to handle a big project. In all honesty, when you do finally get that big project you will be glad you had to work your way up for a couple years. Then you'll have made your mistakes on films where everyone was laid back and could laugh at them, not when say $50,000 is on the line and the producer from company X is threatening to sue/kill you because your computer crashed when you loaded too many vst's and missed the deadline or because you couldn't afford the proper studio to record 13 cellos and now your mix sounds too 'airy' and 'dry'. Working your way up the ropes has its advantages and targeting the specific filmmakers doing projects at the same level as you is the best way to go. Find out who they are and talk to them personally about where you are at. You might just find that they will think its pretty cool you're at the same spot in your career as they are with theirs.

Just a word of advice from an agency guy who sees ALOT of music and hears a lot of filmmaker's frustrations (whether they are making 500$ projects or huge ones!). Feel free to PM me, filmmakers or composers and let me know your thoughts. I hope it helps.

Robert
RobertAlexander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 11:44 AM   #25
Leah Kardos
Basic - Premiere Expired
 
Leah Kardos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bedford, England
Posts: 65
This is a fantastic thread, I must say!

I'm by no means a success story when it comes to composing for film/media, I took a break from it for years while I went all "classical" and focussed on teaching, but I have found that if you do a great job for people they will want to hire you again.

Sometimes I've worked on independent zero-budget films where I've thought the production values and script were lacking, but I always wrote the best quality score I could, with the highest production values I could muster. I figure someone might watch the film and think to themselves "crappy film, but awesome music!" and then look out for my name in the credits. It's surprising how much work leads to more work. Directors and producers learn to trust and respect you. Soon enough they spread the word about you and you find you are suddenly in demand. One of those directors could break through, it could be a significant leg-up in your career.

This thread has oodles of fantastic advice - encourage your boy Bryan and tell him that the cream always rises to the top eventually. If he's the best thing since sliced bread then the secret won't be kept for very long. But don't let the fact that he's talented prevent him from taking part in fun and exciting collaborations with other emerging artists.
Leah Kardos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2009, 10:09 AM   #26
eduardo
Basic Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brazil
Posts: 5
originally posted by Leah Kardos:

"I figure someone might watch the film and think to themselves "crappy film, but awesome music!"

Thatīs the point. Good music reflects good technique (orchestration, counterpoint, harmony and so on), good balance, good taste, strong themes (that sort of remarkable themes), sensibility, and believe me, producers and directors would cut their thumb finger off to get a young composer that has ALL of these qualities I mentioned above and many others that I didnīt mention...

So, I think that the first (and probably the best) way to promote composing for films is the excellent quality of your music. Today every professional (not only in the entertainment industry) are not tolarating avarage or simply good stuffs, they want something better than good, avarage or functional...

I believe that looking for young talented directors (that might be in college right now) is the best way to get a career...

PS
Sorry about my english... Thereīs a long time I donīt practice it....

Take Care!
eduardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
composing, film maker, networking, question


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


©IndieTalk