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Old 03-18-2017, 11:52 PM   #1
harmonica44
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How can I get this type of color grading?

For a project, basically I want the type of color you see in some 60s spaghetti westerns, like here:





Basically the color has sort of a brown tint to it, if you look at the skin tones. Now in Premiere Pro, where I do the grading, brown is not an option. I got red, green blue, yellow, etc.

The way to make brown is by mixing red yellow, and green. But if I increase an equal amount, of red yellow and blue, all I get is more red yellow and blue added. It doesn't actually go brown. Is there a way to get that brown tint in color grading?

Thanks for the input. I really appreciate it.
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Old 03-19-2017, 10:51 AM   #2
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Are you still running CS6?
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:49 PM   #3
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It's called SHOOTING IT THAT WAY.

They didn't do much in the way of "color correction" until relatively recently when computers achieved serious processing power. The only way to "color correct" before computers was to make small adjustments in the chemistry of the film print, which means all of your color matching/grading had to be done in camera.

What a unique concept, actually having to get everything visually correct before it gets to the editor.

This is one of the many things you should be discussing with your DP and editor; your "look" should be completely thought out before you start to shoot. Color correction is supposed to be used to enhance and fix small problems, not create the look of your film.
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Old 03-19-2017, 09:24 PM   #4
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Okay thanks. Yes I am still using CS6.

Well as for shooting it that way, the camera does not seem to have any type of brown tint option. The hue goes from red to green, but not brown. The color temperature can go from cool temperatures to warm ones, but no brown in their either, and it just ranges from more blue, to more yellow.

So what can I do to get that look in camera then, as oppose to grading later?

Last edited by harmonica44; 03-19-2017 at 09:28 PM.
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Old 03-19-2017, 09:31 PM   #5
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LOL!

You just don't get it.
Ever been to such desert like environments?

And indeed: no shit filter in the camera.
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Old 03-19-2017, 09:40 PM   #6
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What am I not getting? No I haven't been to any desert. Since there is no filter in the camera, then how do I get the color tone?

Are you saying that the desert produces that type of brown? But there are all sorts of movies that do not have that brown that are in the desert, such as say, The Spy Who Loved Me, in the scenes when Bond goes to the desert. So I though that that those spaghetti westerns were doing something to get that brown, specifically.

Last edited by harmonica44; 03-19-2017 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 03-19-2017, 10:36 PM   #7
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Yes I am still using CS6.
The short answer is, you don't. I cannot take you seriously while you're running CS6. Upgrade to have a fighting chance and/or add Resolve to color grade. That's assuming CS6 will work with Resolve.

While it's been possible to painfully do some limited color grading in older versions of PP, the newer versions (in the last year or so) have improved the workflow significantly. PP isn't designed to do complex color grading without jumping through awful, painful hoops.

PS. What you're calling that "brown tint" is a combination of many factors. Some need to be achieved on set, some can be achieved in the grade. The best result will be a combination of both. For you to achieve that look in a grade is as simple as to take it to a colorist with a couple of years experience. Get your DP and colorist to meet before you shoot to get on the same page.
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Old 03-20-2017, 12:52 AM   #8
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Okay thanks. I'm pretty sure Resolve will work with CS6 from what I remember from using Resolve a couple of years ago.

I can find a DP and ask him then. When you say you cannot take me seriously while running CS6, why is that? A lot of filmmakers have used CS6, and a couple of years ago, when I got it, it seemed fine, when I talked about it on here. Is it really so bad to use, even if I use Resolve after?

But I was told before to learn to work with what I have, so with that philosophy, what's wrong with using the color plug ins that I have, if I should work with what I have?

Last edited by harmonica44; 03-20-2017 at 01:18 AM.
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Old 03-20-2017, 03:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
I'm pretty sure
That's now for you to figure out.

Quote:
I was told before to learn to work with what I have, so with that philosophy, what's wrong with using the color plug ins that I have, if I should work with what I have?
It's sage advice for normal human beings. As you're well aware, you lack the ability to research on your own and reasonably extrapolate answers. You aren't exactly known for being capable of simple problem solving.

You're constantly asking questions about software that no one here uses. You have requirement to be spoon fed. No one cares enough to go back to relearn the software and it's issues in how it relates with current production methods. I guess you failed to figure that out, so consider this your spoon fed moment.

If you don't care enough to help yourself, why should anyone else care?

Quote:
Is it really so bad to use, even if I use Resolve after?
I'll sum it up again. For a normal person who can figure out how to make it work, it'll be great. For you, it's a disaster in which you'll spend the rest of your time in film school posting questions about how to get it working (what probably amounts to $15 a month where you are, less since you're a student) instead of spending the most of your time learning the craft of filmmaking. Are you really willing to waste your film school tuition fee to save one to two hundred dollars? It's time you got serious. It pisses me off that entitled schmucks waste thousands of dollars without the intention of being serious about the craft.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:36 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by harmonica44 View Post
What am I not getting? No I haven't been to any desert. Since there is no filter in the camera, then how do I get the color tone?

Are you saying that the desert produces that type of brown? But there are all sorts of movies that do not have that brown that are in the desert, such as say, The Spy Who Loved Me, in the scenes when Bond goes to the desert. So I though that that those spaghetti westerns were doing something to get that brown, specifically.
Digital color is RGB. So yeah, of course there is no brown filter.
You need to tweak the 3 channels or use a filter on the lens to do that for you.
And yes, such desert like locations can give you warmer tones: such locations contain a lot of red/brown/yellow/grey rocks/sand, the green of plants is often not fresh green. The clothes used in westerns or in the red/brown/black/beige range of colors. So are the buildings: wood. Caucasian actors ready for long days in the sun often have this brown/red tan from spending time in the desert sun.
So the starting point is already close to that look. They choose certain filmstock and had it developed in a way that gives this look.

What effects do you use when you try to grade?
Any before/after footage to share?
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Old 03-20-2017, 09:13 AM   #11
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Okay thanks. So far I have been using RGB curves to grade as well as the three way color corrector, and the hue wheel.

But haven't quite gotten brown yet. I thought I could get a brown tint, minus the clothes. But I can try to get it as good as I can and go from there.

Quote:
I'll sum it up again. For a normal person who can figure out how to make it work, it'll be great. For you, it's a disaster in which you'll spend the rest of your time in film school posting questions about how to get it working (what probably amounts to $15 a month where you are, less since you're a student) instead of spending the most of your time learning the craft of filmmaking. Are you really willing to waste your film school tuition fee to save one to two hundred dollars? It's time you got serious. It pisses me off that entitled schmucks waste thousands of dollars without the intention of being serious about the craft.
What do you mean saving 1-200 dollars? Are you saying that I am wasting my money on school and that I won't learn anything beneficial?
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Old 03-20-2017, 09:48 AM   #12
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What did I explain to you about the hue wheel?
Unless you know what you are doing the hue wheel will only mess your colors up.

Or are you talking about the color wheels in a 3 way color corrector?

PS.
That grade is the least of your concerns, you need a script with 3 characters, 1 location and a story that is emotionally moving. turning your project 'brownish' doesn't accomplish any of them.
Work on the basics of your assignment first before bikeshedding even more about details that are just polishing the tird if you don't get the foundations right.
No teacher will give you great grades like this: "You story was boring, you didn't follow the assignment, but that brown tint is so beautiful I'll give you a B+"

You'll never get anywhere when you keep micromanaging the final stage before you set step 1, 2 and 3 first.
If your short is great, but lacks colorgrade you'll accomplish more than vice versa.
You can always grade it after the deadline to make it look even better.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:58 AM   #13
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What do you mean saving 1-200 dollars? Are you saying that I am wasting my money on school and that I won't learn anything beneficial?
If you continue to act like this, yes, you're wasting your money. No question. You're in a "Can't see the forest for the trees" mode. While you continue to be like that, you're wasting your money at that film school.

Quote:
So far I have been using RGB curves to grade as well as the three way color corrector, and the hue wheel.

But haven't quite gotten brown yet. I thought I could get a brown tint, minus the clothes. But I can try to get it as good as I can and go from there.
Yep. I understood your initial description (for once) and could (generally) tell what you were doing. It's beyond not only your ability but your comprehension. You didn't understand the basics a year or two ago, and you still don't get it.

There's nothing wrong with not being able to do a task. There are many tasks I am incapable of doing. There are also many tasks that I can do that others can do better. For instance, I had to color grade a TV show a couple of weeks back. Not only am I weaker than most professional colorists at the task, it needed to be completed in record time. About 90 minutes.

You need to accept you're incapable of doing this on your own and you need get other people help complete this task for you. If you don't learn this simple skill, you have ZERO chance to become a director.
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Old 03-20-2017, 01:06 PM   #14
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You keep asking if you are wasting money in film school. YES. But film school is not a waste of money, YOU are the one deciding to waste it.

If all you wanted to do was ask us the same ole questions and create roadblocks for yourself why did you go? That is rhetorical.

Why are you in school if you refuse to utilize the tools? And yes the study body and teachers are tools are your disposal! This does not need a reply. In fact you should log out and heed this advice, rent a camera and edit bay, shoot, talk to people, network, ask these questions to students, get it done!
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Old 03-20-2017, 01:35 PM   #15
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[ psycic mode]

Okay, thanks, but will I look professional if I have to ask this to other students?

[ /psycic mode]

Last edited by WalterB; 03-20-2017 at 03:31 PM.
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