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Old 07-14-2018, 12:06 PM   #1
Panos
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Advise to the director

I would like to ask if there is a way to write that you don't want the camera to show something. I know it is director's job and I know they will get it but I ask in case there is any such advise. Like sometimes you write CU when it is very important for the story, is there the opposite like "don't show" when it is very important for the story.
example:
Two friends are looking at a wall and there is a drawing and below the drawing an ancient phrase. I want the audience in cinema to see the drawing but not the phrase, because the drawing is important for the rest of the story and the phrase is the surprise at the end of the movie. Can I advise the director to show only the drawing and not the phrase?
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:48 PM   #2
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The director should know that from reading the script.


And the word is "Advice"
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Old 07-14-2018, 04:08 PM   #3
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I'd probably write something like... Words beneath the poster are omitted from audience view.

Don't put a CU or camera direction in the script, leave that up to the director.
He can decide the method of omission, maybe there is debris obscuring the words like when you have random plants view blocking the genitals of naked people in the garden of eden. Or maybe it's a close up? That's up to director.
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Old 07-14-2018, 05:15 PM   #4
indietalk
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The script is what we see on sceen so um don't write it in. Done
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Old 07-14-2018, 07:45 PM   #5
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Thank you for the answers! Indietalk that's true. But there is a practical problem when you write :

EXT. WALL - DAY
On the walk there is a drawing of a kid.
Mark
Nice drawing. And what are these letters below?
Alec
Oh, no one knows. They say that they are letters of an old language...

Of course I'm not mentioning the letters in the WALL scene, but also I'm not mentioning that the audience must not see the letters which are exactly below!. The story is in the far future and the letters are English language, so it is important for the director to move his camera a bit up so the letters won't appear! I tend to believe that it is one of the rare cases that you have to help the director and write it clearly that the audience must not see the letters.
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Old 07-14-2018, 08:42 PM   #6
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yeah if you don't put it in the script they could film without the words and you screw up your ending
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Old 07-14-2018, 08:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos View Post
Thank you for the answers! Indietalk that's true. But there is a practical problem when you write :

EXT. WALL - DAY
On the walk there is a drawing of a kid.
Mark
Nice drawing. And what are these letters below?
Alec
Oh, no one knows. They say that they are letters of an old language...

Of course I'm not mentioning the letters in the WALL scene, but also I'm not mentioning that the audience must not see the letters which are exactly below!. The story is in the far future and the letters are English language, so it is important for the director to move his camera a bit up so the letters won't appear! I tend to believe that it is one of the rare cases that you have to help the director and write it clearly that the audience must not see the letters.
Okay, so you’ve set up the scene with a drawing on the wall. Follow it with a reveal.

READ THIS.
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:28 AM   #8
mlesemann
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"Below the drawing is the top edge of what appears to be writing."
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:41 AM   #9
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AcousticAl I've read that article long time ago. It is irrelevant because it doesn't answer to my question. If I'm wrong please mention the part where it does.

sfoster thank you. I'll use: Words beneath the drawing are omitted from audience view.
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:44 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlesemann View Post
"Below the drawing is the top edge of what appears to be writing."
Wow that's great too! But the problem is that the description I do for the drawing forces for a close up and therefore if the director doesn't know that he must not show the words he might show them with close up, and the words are just English language
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:47 AM   #11
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mlesemann sorry, I was to hurry to answer. I think it is absolutely perfect!!!
sfoster vs mlesemann = 0 - 1
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:08 AM   #12
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what can i say, shes got style
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:45 AM   #13
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"Words beneath the poster are omitted from audience view." is perfect, it forces the director not to show the words but only the drawing, but still it is direction advise.
"Below the drawing is the top edge of what appears to be writing." forces as well the director not to show the words and it is also not a direction advise.

I learnt many things today from all of you! I wonder if there is anyone who can beat mlesemann...
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Old 07-15-2018, 12:08 PM   #14
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Don't stress it too much. If the reader does not see the letters but the characters do in this scene, and if they are revealed in the end and it is vital to the story and ending, that's how it will be directed. Literally when you write them out in the end, that is the reveal and obvious.

I think you are overthinking it a bit and perhaps worried that some amateurish director will show them too early simply because the set was created lol...
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Old 07-15-2018, 12:35 PM   #15
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Exactly indietalk! I was thinking of that. These words are a huge surprise and it is obvious that they should be reviled at the end!
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