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Old 10-22-2018, 12:04 AM   #16
Alcove Audio
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I get how hard it is to get to that "star" status, Believe me I know!
You only think that you know. You ain't seen nothin' yet.

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Originally Posted by pedramyz View Post
but ... I can't afford to give in to this intimidating belief.
No, you must accept this harsh reality.

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I always put into account the challenges ahead of me when I'm deciding something.
You don't have enough experience yet to "in your gut" know the challenges ahead of you.

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But I won't be able to operate to the fullest of my potential if I constantly keep thinking about the challenges ahead of me.
No, you accept and welcome the challenges ahead; that's what you are working towards.

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That dreaming is part of my coping mechanism to keep me going. I can't keep thinking about the one in a million chance of success everyday if I want to write something good.. If I do that, before long I'll find my mind locked only onto the failures, not expecting anything good to happen to me and eventually loosing my ambitious dreams. I can't give in to this intimidation without loosing the courage to have my own voice. I know there is a 99.99% chance that I won't make it, but I choose not to listen to it just so that I get to give it my best.
But it's not a dream and it's not an intimidation; it's a goal.

To do anything well requires discipline. That means practicing your craft every day. For you that means, for now, writing every day. Throughout my entire professional career as a musician I practiced almost every day. I learned multiple genres of music. I kept expanding my repertoire. I expanded my network. I kept up on technology. I grabbed tips from every pro I could get my ears near.

In other words, it's lot's of hard work. And, by the way, even if it's substandard work, you still maintained your discipline. It was once mentioned to me that we need days like that to get rid of all the crap before we get to the good stuff.

Sci-Fi author John Varley used to write fictional biographies for random names pulled from the phone book when he was not feeling inspired. One of those bios inspired an entire novel. Orson Scott Card still attends writing seminars. There's all kinds of things to do when you're uninspired.

So, for now, write, write, write. Get a few few scripts under your belt. Even if they're bad short scripts, at least they're completed short scripts.

Good luck!
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Old 10-22-2018, 09:23 AM   #17
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Right now, my suggestion is to worry more about writing. Getting 4 or 5 (or more) scripts of varying genres and budgets to a similar level that you are happy with. That doesn't mean avoid contacting Producers or Agents - if an opportunity comes up, why not see where it goes. But do it smart, and focus on developing yourself and your skills in the meantime.

If you were to engage an agent, they will ask you for a number of different works that they can use to shop you around anyway. Producers of TV series will ask your agent for samples if you go for gigs on major shows.

Way too many writers spend 10 years perfecting the one script, then try and shop it around and no-one's interested in it. Or someone is interested in them but not the specific project (for any number of reasons), but they have nothing else to pitch.

And yes, if you want to creatively contribute to the filmmaking process, you should get some experience in the filmmaking process.


I'm saying don't scare off a Producer by bombarding them with unrealistic expectations from the get go. For all I know, your script is the next Star Wars. If it is, and a Producer is willing to do these things for you, then sure - go ahead. Awesome.
It's your career man, do what you think you should. If you can get a Producer to pay you, sponsor you and let you head up the film - then awesome! But I don't know that I would pass up the opportunity to get my film made based on those requirements, and I don't think I would front them to the Producer unless they were really interested in my script.
I'd probably rather build a track record first.




There's a difference between being smart about opportunities and your approach and simply wildly hoping for unrealistic pipe dreams. Sure, maybe 0.01% of people who dream about making it in Hollywood actually make it. Of those, probably 0.01% of them at most were picked out of nowhere, from a foreign country, with no track record or experience.

No-one's discouraging you from trying, we're giving you advice to make the most of your opportunities and give you the best chance of success. Not getting everything lined up, and working on your own skillset is setting yourself up to fail.
At the end of the day, you can take that advice on board or not - it's your career.
Thank you man! Based on most professionals' advice here, I heed this advice. I decided not to show this script to an agent or a producer unless I have a couple of different scripts with different genres at my disposal.In the meantime I try to edit this current script to submit it to different festivals, and working on other scripts ( I have so many ideas) and of course try to make a couple of shorts too.

Again I thank all of you for making the time to help a rookie out.
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Old 10-22-2018, 09:32 AM   #18
directorik
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I just have a question for this part. Do you know of any deals that provide me with a working opportunity in U.S?
I don't know of any deals like that.

Producers are not in the business of providing work opportunities
for non U.S citizens. They are in the business of making movies.
If you write a script they want they will buy it. If you are the right
choice as director they will hire you to direct it.

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So what I can take away from this is that right now I should avoid contacting any producers or agents. Unless I have 4 or 5 scripts ( preferably low budget ). and If I want to demand to get final cut, I need to have some shorts in my resume instead of relying on the intense courses right?
It is standard for a writer with only one script to show that script
to a producer. An agent is unlikely to accept a client with only one
script.

There are about 5 directors in the U.S. who have final cut. The
chances of a producer giving you final cut is zero. The person or
company putting up the money gets final cut. If you want final cut
on your movie put up the money.

Intense courses might be good. But a producer looking for a director
will be far more impressed by someone who has directed several
excellent short films.
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Old 10-22-2018, 09:39 AM   #19
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If you are the right
choice as director they will hire you to direct it.
This one provides the working opportunity right?
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Old 10-22-2018, 12:58 PM   #20
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This one provides the working opportunity right?
Fine. That's the one.
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Old 10-22-2018, 02:10 PM   #21
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Don't even bother with the "working opportunity" bit right now. Write a kickass script and get it sold. Now you have your foot in the door. The odds are, you will not get to direct this script. If you're not okay with that, write some other scripts you are okay with selling outright. In the meantime, you can get experience directing. Make some short films. Get the skills you need. Then, maybe you'll have a shot at selling your big project AND directing it. And if that happens, they'll help get you over to the US if they really want you. But you need to give them a reason to want you.

Last edited by El Director; 10-22-2018 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 10-22-2018, 02:38 PM   #22
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Don't even bother with the "working opportunity" bit right now. Write a kickass script and get it sold. Now you have your foot in the door. The odds are, you will not get to direct this script. If you're not okay with that, write some other scripts you are okay with selling outright. In the meantime, you can get experience directing. Make some short films. Get the skills you need. Then, maybe you'll have a shot at selling your big project AND directing it. And if that happens, they'll help get you over to the US if they really want you. But you need to give them a reason to want you.
Yeah, that's excellent advice, I figured I do that.
Yes I'm not ready to give this script up, so I will try to write something else that I can let go.

Can I use this script to win some screen writing contests then use that success to sell other scripts I wrote? but not the one that already won? Will buyers only want the winner script or as long as you've won a contest they won't care about which script you want to give them?
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Old 10-23-2018, 01:44 PM   #23
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Yeah, that's excellent advice, I figured I do that.
Yes I'm not ready to give this script up, so I will try to write something else that I can let go.
That's really bad logic. You have to put your best work out there first!!!!!!

Say you are a baker. And you have a kickass cookie recipe. But there are so many steps to make it to the big time, you decide to use a different recipe and save the kickass recipe for later... no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Also you may think that script is the best thing since sliced bread. But once you get it out there you will have new "best ever" scripts. You may even look back and cringe! So just get it out there!
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Old 10-23-2018, 02:21 PM   #24
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That's really bad logic. You have to put your best work out there first!!!!!!

Say you are a baker. And you have a kickass cookie recipe. But there are so many steps to make it to the big time, you decide to use a different recipe and save the kickass recipe for later... no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Also you may think that script is the best thing since sliced bread. But once you get it out there you will have new "best ever" scripts. You may even look back and cringe! So just get it out there!
this script is really personal for me, I have tons of other ideas equally interesting but not as personal.
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Old 10-23-2018, 02:24 PM   #25
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Can I use this script to win some screen writing contests then use that success to sell other scripts I wrote? but not the one that already won? Will buyers only want the winner script or as long as you've won a contest they won't care about which script you want to give them?
Winning some screen writing contests can boost your recognition
to agents and producers.

Buyers want the script that best suits their needs. A producer
may not want the winning script for many different reasons but
may want a script from you.

That's why we are all saying that having several scripts is a good
thing.

I disagree with indietalk's example; if you're a baker with a kick-ass
cookie recipe but you don't want anyone else making those cookies
it might be a good idea to come up with a different (also kick-ass)
cookie recipe to sell to others. Get your name out there, show your
recipes are liked by others then make those first cookies yourself.

pedramyz, since you want not only to direct but you want full creative
control and final cut all paid for by an American producer one way to
earn that very rare place in American film making is to show how
valuable you are. A few screenplay sales can help. A few short films
and a low budget feature as writer/director can help.

There isn't one path. Perhaps your current script will be seen by an
American producer who wants it bad enough to bring you to the U.S.,
hire you to direct and give you final cut. If you don't show the script
you can not get that opportunity.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:25 PM   #26
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Winning some screen writing contests can boost your recognition
to agents and producers.

Buyers want the script that best suits their needs. A producer
may not want the winning script for many different reasons but
may want a script from you.

That's why we are all saying that having several scripts is a good
thing.

I disagree with indietalk's example; if you're a baker with a kick-ass
cookie recipe but you don't want anyone else making those cookies
it might be a good idea to come up with a different (also kick-ass)
cookie recipe to sell to others. Get your name out there, show your
recipes are liked by others then make those first cookies yourself.

pedramyz, since you want not only to direct but you want full creative
control and final cut all paid for by an American producer one way to
earn that very rare place in American film making is to show how
valuable you are. A few screenplay sales can help. A few short films
and a low budget feature as writer/director can help.

There isn't one path. Perhaps your current script will be seen by an
American producer who wants it bad enough to bring you to the U.S.,
hire you to direct and give you final cut. If you don't show the script
you can not get that opportunity.
Yeah I figured I follow your advice. I will start working on my other ideas to write a couple of scripts and also edit this current script to submit to contests the following year. I'm also looking for ways to gather some funds to make some shorts. But I have to figure out my priorities first. I think working on couple of good scripts comes first, and after I've done that I should start making shorts.

and about the final cut, to be honest I don't really know to what degree not having final cut privilege can affect your control over the movie. I've searched for directors who currently have final cut, among them is ridley scott, but there is no mention of david lynch or quentin tarantino ! Tarantino has demanded final cut for his upcoming feature, once upon a time in hollywood, and sony has agreed to his terms. But I haven't seen any mention of other final cut privileges in any of lynch's or tarantino's movies! So if they managed to make the final version of their movies look like that without the final cut, then I don't really need final cut.

Last edited by pedramyz; 10-23-2018 at 04:31 PM.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:32 PM   #27
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I disagree with indietalk's example; if you're a baker with a kick-ass
cookie recipe but you don't want anyone else making those cookies
it might be a good idea to come up with a different (also kick-ass)
cookie recipe to sell to others. Get your name out there, show your
recipes are liked by others then make those first cookies yourself.
It's so hard to get out there I'm more about putting your best out there first! Because it might not even be as good as you think, so then what is the second option going to be?
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:33 PM   #28
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But he said because it is personal, so I get it more now.
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Old 10-23-2018, 10:33 PM   #29
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is it bad?" what writer thinks his/her work is not good?
Most aspiring writers.

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I can't be the judge of my own work.
For the majority or writers out there, if you're good, you'll know. The issue is a lot of bad writers also think they're good.

If your material is bad, if you put additional conditions/demands on your script, you may blow any chance for the relationship to bloom.

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Obviously you don't want to. That's fine, but you don't need to be vindictive about it. Does stomping on rookies turn you on? Does it fuel your ego or does it help with the insecurity issues?
Wow. Who pissed in your milk?

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Yes I'm not ready to give this script up, so I will try to write something else that I can let go.
It's probably a good idea... but on the other hand... you have someone interested in your current script.
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Old 10-23-2018, 11:05 PM   #30
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Yes I'm not ready to give this script up, so I will try to write something else that I can let go.
There's nothing that says you have to accept an option offer if it is even offered to you in the first place.

You've started a relationship with a Producer, pitched them your idea which they like and now you're not even going to send them the script? You're going to attempt to send them another script that you haven't even begun writing...?

Why not just send an email along the lines of:
'Dear Producer. Following up on our conversation a few weeks ago, I've attached my script for you, thought you might like to read it. It's a very personal story for me and one I'd love to be able to make one day. Let me know your thoughts, Cheers'

You might never hear back. Don't overthink it, man. Yes, you should get all your ducks lined up, and you should have a number of scripts ready to go. But here's a potential opportunity you have. Send it off and see what happens - probably it will be nothing. All it takes is a response of 'great, I like your work, keep sending me stuff' and you've started a relationship with a Producer - who you can now send those 4-5 extra scripts you'll be working on.

You miss 100% of the shots you don't take
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