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Old 10-30-2018, 02:15 PM   #1
robotkubo
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best microphone?

looking on getting a new microphone for my dslr. I always see the RODE mics around but they are a bit costly. I also see absolutley a ton of other no name shotgun mics on amazon for like $30-50. are these even worth it? should I just pick one with the best reviews? or should I just bite the bullet and buy a high value one?
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Old 10-30-2018, 03:43 PM   #2
directorik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robotkubo View Post
looking on getting a new microphone for my dslr. I always see the RODE mics around but they are a bit costly. I also see absolutley a ton of other no name shotgun mics on amazon for like $30-50. are these even worth it? should I just pick one with the best reviews? or should I just bite the bullet and buy a high value one?
There are several threads here regarding microphones. Have
you looked at any of them?

If you are really looking for the "best microphone" you need to
bite the bullet and buy a high value one. If you are looking for
a cheap microphone then go with one you can afford.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:11 PM   #3
Alcove Audio
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Details, details, details! We need more info if you want suggestions that are germane to your situation.

What are you shooting - narrative, run&gun, interviews……?

Which specific camera?

How much sound-for-picture experience do you have?


Firstly, just buying a "better" microphone and plopping it on top of your camera will not get you better sound. Solid production sound is the result of knowledge, skill and dedication to capturing quality production sound.

The optimum position for the mic is above and slightly in front of the actor(s) aimed at the notch at the base of the actors throat. So, unless your actors do not move at all, the aim of the mic must be constantly adjusted to insure optimum pick-up.

Now, on to mics. Rode mics are relatively inexpensive when you consider the fact that professional mics for production sound can run up to and even over $2,000. They are usually connected to additional thousands of dollars of mixers and recorders. So immediately nix the bargain basement mics; they are poorly made, are overly hyped in some frequencies and, as they are Hi-Z mics, are prone to RF and EM interference.

Your project will only look as good as it sounds, because
"Sound is half of the experience"

If your film looks terrible but has great sound, people might just think it's your aesthetic.
If your film looks great and has bad sound, people will think you're an amateur.
Sound is the first indicator to the industry that you know what you're doing.

You should most definitely read "The Location Sound Bible" by Ric Viers; it's a good introduction into production sound.


Depending upon your camera one of the Rode mics will do a decent job as will the Audio-Technica ATR6550.


As always, I recommend that you retain someone to do the production sound for you, or renting what you need.
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Old 10-31-2018, 01:27 PM   #4
Benny Wollin
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Dang, Alcove. You always have such thorough answers. Thanks for sharing your expertise.
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Old 10-31-2018, 01:30 PM   #5
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Thanks for such detailed help, I'm gonna save and get the best equipment for audio I can and get a buddy of mine who's working in sound design to give me a hand. I still have much to learn
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Old 10-31-2018, 11:04 PM   #6
Alcove Audio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robotkubo View Post
I can ... get a buddy of mine who's working in sound design to give me a hand. I still have much to learn
See if you can convince him to be your PSM/Boom-op. He (hopefully) already has some technical and practical experience, so he "only" needs to learn a few new techniques/skills. Being a boom-op is HARD, but really good ones make a very nice living. During preproduction you should also do a script consultation with him to get a sonic perspective on your project if he is the one that will be doing the audio post.
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Old 11-01-2018, 07:17 AM   #7
robotkubo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcove Audio View Post
See if you can convince him to be your PSM/Boom-op. He (hopefully) already has some technical and practical experience, so he "only" needs to learn a few new techniques/skills. Being a boom-op is HARD, but really good ones make a very nice living. During preproduction you should also do a script consultation with him to get a sonic perspective on your project if he is the one that will be doing the audio post.
Thanks, will do.
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Old 11-01-2018, 01:07 PM   #8
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Should I get a single boom mic setup or should that also accompany mics on each actor? can I just get away with a simple shotgun mic? There is little to no dialogue since they're are only two people and mostly its one talking directly to the camera. any suggestions?
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Old 11-01-2018, 02:52 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robotkubo View Post
Should I get a single boom mic setup or should that also accompany mics on each actor? can I just get away with a simple shotgun mic? There is little to no dialogue since they're are only two people and mostly its one talking directly to the camera. any suggestions?
The job of the boom-op is to keep the boomed mic accurately aimed, so for most situations one boomed mic is enough.

Again, HOW your audio gear will be used is decided by the PSM (Production Sound Mixer) and/or the boom-op. For your described situation a single mic on a boom-pole would be sufficient. If you are shooting outdoors a shotgun mic is probably your best option; if you are indoors a hypercardioid may be preferable.

Here's a few videos about production sound.







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