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Old 04-11-2018, 01:04 PM   #1
Future_Screen
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Beginner vs. Pro - What’s the exactly different?

I found a nice article about the writing style of a pro and a beginner. It shows the different style between them. But I don’t really check the difference. Could you explain it to me, please?
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Old 04-11-2018, 01:33 PM   #2
Quality
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For some reason I find this article condescending. The difference with the pro and amateur is that there's more detail in the screenplay, which can easily be addressed while shooting. At the ed of the day, there is no wrong or write in writing a scene as long as you follow the basic screenplay format. As long as the reader can understand the scene, that is all that matters.
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Old 04-11-2018, 03:38 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quality View Post
At the ed of the day, there is no wrong or write in writing a scene as long as you follow the basic screenplay format. As long as the reader can understand the scene, that is all that matters.
If there’s no write in writing, you have a blank page.

Brushing it off as no right or wrong is a bit shortsighted. There’s good writing, and there’s bad writing. And I’d argue that there’s more of the latter running around out there than there is of the former.

Last edited by AcousticAl; 04-11-2018 at 05:40 PM. Reason: Typos, because iPhone.
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Old 04-11-2018, 05:05 PM   #4
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Quote:
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.............At the ed of the day, there is no wrong or write in writing a scene as long as you follow the basic screenplay format. As long as the reader can understand the scene, that is all that matters.
That is almost like saying that understanding a script makes it a good script.
I have had a script in my hands to shoot, and I understood what was meant.
And I crossed out 2 pages and condensed it to 2 lines of action and 1 line of dialogue.

So, those 2 pages were not right.
If the writers had more time they would have rewritten it, I'm sure, but the 48Hour clock was ticking.
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Old 04-11-2018, 05:31 PM   #5
directorik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quality View Post
For some reason I find this article condescending. The difference with the pro and amateur is that there's more detail in the screenplay, which can easily be addressed while shooting. At the ed of the day, there is no wrong or write in writing a scene as long as you follow the basic screenplay format. As long as the reader can understand the scene, that is all that matters.
There is right and wrong in all writing. That article addresses some
of those rights and wrongs. It is “wrong” to not engage the reader.
A screenplay can be in perfect, flawless format and not be interesting.
That is wrong. It can be in perfect, flawless format and be poorly
written. It can be written so a reader understands the scene but still
leaves the reader uninterested and not engaged in what is happening.

Using words well is what a good (dare I say professional) writer does.
There is more to a screenplay than basic screenplay format and the
reader understanding the scene.
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Old 04-12-2018, 12:39 PM   #6
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IMHO it's about the voice of the two different examples which many people call "style".

Think of it maybe this way. When you tell a good ghost story around the campfire, it's important HOW you tell the story. If you just stand there and mono-tonally rattle off the events (Ben Stein voice) then it sucks. You gotta infuse tone, setting, intrigue, etc.

Or think of it like a blueprint. Some screenplays are like blueprints, I would say the best ones are artist renderings based on the blue prints.

Which is more appealing:


Or

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Old 04-12-2018, 01:18 PM   #7
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In example one, "walks nervously" does not tell us much. In example two we can feel just how nervous he is by the way it is written.
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