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Old 04-17-2017, 06:03 AM   #1
Sonder_88
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Question Do these still exist?

I am currently working on my first (full-length) screenplay (which I hope to eventually direct). In terms of style, I am a big fan of the Steadicam/Panaglide type cameras for their "floating" POV shots (like in the original Halloween). I want this type of shot/shooting for several scenes in my film (to create/illicit a certain type of feeling), while the rest of the film would be shot using more "traditional" style camera(s). My question is, do Steadicams/Panaglide still exist nowadays? And if not, is there a modern-day (and attainable) equivalent????

(* I am completely new to filmmaking and do not have any extensive technical knowledge in regards to cameras, types of lenses, etc... I am currently just in the writing process right now, but I do know exactly how I want each scene to particularly look & feel! I just need some advice in selecting the right particular technical tools to get help me there.)

I'd like to know budget-wise what these would go for (in terms of renting and/or buying) as well. ( I will be on a very tight budget, so I would like to know these things far in advance, as well as have ample time to practice and learn more about using this type of camera). I live in an area that does not offer any type of film school instruction/classes, so I am grateful for an specific advice/knowledge anyone has to offer. Thank you
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Old 04-17-2017, 06:23 PM   #2
jax_rox
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Of course - steadicams still exist.

These days, many are using gimbals to get stabilised footage. Assuming you're shooting on a lightweight camera, you can probably buy a cheap gimbal for about the cost of 1-2 days of a professional steadicam operator and their entire kit.

THat said, you can also get very affordable steadicam-type systems for lightweight cameras (even cheaper than gimbals!)
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Old 04-17-2017, 06:45 PM   #3
AcousticAl
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Steadicam still exists, along with competing brands like Glidecam. There are also Asian-manufactured knock-offs of varying degrees of quality (mostly poor). And, as jax_rox mentioned, gimbals are particularly popular right now. Don't expect to get into the Gimbal game, with a reliable unit, for less than $1000.

You're headed down a fuitless road, dude. You have your hopes set high on your first feature, and you say you know exactly how you want each scene to look and to feel while you admit you know nothing of cameras and lensing (I assume lighting and sound as well). These are things you need to know. Or... how about you partner with someone who knows?

A low budget is not the way to invest in gear for your first feature. Use your limited funds for props, wardrobe, and to feed people. Find some other folks in your area who are up for a fun project... a camera owner/op, somebody who can light and has a few good tools available, somebody who knows sound and has at least a basic kit. Don't sink your money on cheap gear that may or may not last the production of your first project. Focus on directing. Articulate your vision, and let others who have some skills take care of "selecting the right particular technical tools" to get you there.
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Old 04-17-2017, 09:35 PM   #4
Sonder_88
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Thank you both, I appreciate it. I am on the search for a good DP/cinematographer that has (obviously) more experience and knowledge of cameras and how to use them than me. (Someone I can clearly express my vision and ideas to & with work with closely.) I would never dream of pretending to have to the adequate knowledge to attempt to do this part of filmmaking (or lighting, sound, or any of the other important individual things that are necessary for a feature) on my own. I know that a big factor in getting things done right is in finding and hiring the right people. I am just asking about things (like these types of cameras for instance) so I can clearly communicate with my (future) DP about what I want and the types of things I am going for (without sounding completely insane).
Living out in the middle of nowhere (with no access to real film school), there is slim pickings for me to get in touch with like-minded filmmmaker types, and those who have the particular skills I am looking for. ( I am taking a multimedia course next year @ a community college that focuses on editing - film included - so at least I will be able to educate myself hands-on in that respect)... (but other than that there is absolutely no "film" related classes.) So I am just asking about cameras (and what's available nowadays) so I know what (possible) options there are.
I also say low-budget (and mean it) bc that is the only chance in hell I have of ever making my feature. (There is no other option for me & never will be.) I've heard of people using Kickstarter to successfully raise $ (for their own projects), so that is the only thing that gave me a remote glimmer of hope about this whole thing... ( I grew up in a household that lived from paycheck to paycheck, rarely had hot water and I was lucky [as a kid] if I got a new pair of sneakers about every 3 or 4 years. ...) So there is no extravagant $ resources I can (ever) rely on in terms of funding my project. I am just continuing to "press on" so to speak, because I believe in my story and believe it is worth telling. And when/if I find the right people (with the skills I need) to help me, I know that together we could make something great. I know it sounds maybe (overly) idealistic, but that is really all I have at this point & I'm not going to quit on it. ... I'm just trying to pick up any and all knowledge I can along the way and educate myself in the meantime so I can feel organized with what I am doing (bit by bit).... thank you again.

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Old 05-23-2017, 07:40 PM   #5
joey1320
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Hello Sonder,

As others have stated, after you finish the writing then comes the fun part, making it. Others have given great advice so I can't really add much more to that aspect so my advice is to maybe start small, meaning a short movie.

Try writing a short movie after you are done with your feature and shoot it first. This will be a great learning tool which will help you along the way.

If you feel truly passionate about your feature and want to do it justice, you may want to turn it into a novel and self publish it via Amazon. Maybe that way, if you get a good following, you may be able to secure your some crowd funding. Just an idea.
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Old 05-28-2017, 06:44 AM   #6
Sonder_88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joey1320 View Post
Hello Sonder,

As others have stated, after you finish the writing then comes the fun part, making it. Others have given great advice so I can't really add much more to that aspect so my advice is to maybe start small, meaning a short movie.

Try writing a short movie after you are done with your feature and shoot it first. This will be a great learning tool which will help you along the way.

If you feel truly passionate about your feature and want to do it justice, you may want to turn it into a novel and self publish it via Amazon. Maybe that way, if you get a good following, you may be able to secure your some crowd funding. Just an idea.

Thank you, I really appreciate it.
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Old 06-07-2017, 10:30 PM   #7
KomodoreDragon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonder_88 View Post
I am currently working on my first (full-length) screenplay (which I hope to eventually direct). In terms of style, I am a big fan of the Steadicam/Panaglide type cameras for their "floating" POV shots (like in the original Halloween). I want this type of shot/shooting for several scenes in my film (to create/illicit a certain type of feeling), while the rest of the film would be shot using more "traditional" style camera(s). My question is, do Steadicams/Panaglide still exist nowadays? And if not, is there a modern-day (and attainable) equivalent????

(* I am completely new to filmmaking and do not have any extensive technical knowledge in regards to cameras, types of lenses, etc... I am currently just in the writing process right now, but I do know exactly how I want each scene to particularly look & feel! I just need some advice in selecting the right particular technical tools to get help me there.)

I'd like to know budget-wise what these would go for (in terms of renting and/or buying) as well. ( I will be on a very tight budget, so I would like to know these things far in advance, as well as have ample time to practice and learn more about using this type of camera). I live in an area that does not offer any type of film school instruction/classes, so I am grateful for an specific advice/knowledge anyone has to offer. Thank you

They are still available. Actually, you can find a lot of them in the market.
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