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Old 06-11-2016, 10:11 PM   #1
chenjie108
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Tips for rehearsing/directing theater actors?

Title says it all.

Any tips on getting actors to just be/react, and not project their emotions?
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Old 06-12-2016, 03:59 AM   #2
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I'm not sure I understand your question. Could you elaborate?
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Old 06-12-2016, 11:13 AM   #3
chenjie108
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Open question, make of it what you want!

Interested in hearing film directors speak of their experience with theater actors, and vice-versa.
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Old 06-13-2016, 02:14 AM   #4
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But, the question isn't clear at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chenjie108 View Post
Any tips on getting actors to just be/react, and not project their emotions?
I don't know what that means. Literally, what do you mean by that? I have a lot of experience working with cast members who come from a theater background. I think most legit film actors come from a theater background. They understand that the two mediums require different techniques. So, what was your question? Seriously, I don't know what you're asking.
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Old 06-14-2016, 08:41 PM   #5
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Interesting, you haven't had my problem yet

I've more than once had actors from theater backgrounds, and not much if any film experience, do too much in front of the camera, over-acting, "fake" stuff. Good actors, they've done their work and can engage, but there's just too much in the reactions—You know what I mean?

If not, no worries! Anyone else?
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:12 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chenjie108 View Post
Interesting, you haven't had my problem yet

I've more than once had actors from theater backgrounds, and not much if any film experience, do too much in front of the camera, over-acting, "fake" stuff. Good actors, they've done their work and can engage, but there's just too much in the reactions—You know what I mean?

If not, no worries! Anyone else?
Okay, so the original question was how to get your actors to not over-act? I think you just gotta talk to 'em. Maybe try to find out their experience in filmmaking, maybe ask for a reel if they have one. Depending on the situation, maybe the difference between acting for theater vs. acting for film needs to be addressed at the beginning of production. And then while rehearsing/shooting, if you see someone go to far, I'd simply just ask them to tone it down. You gotta choose your words carefully of course, but I don't see anything wrong with just being straight-forward. Like, hey, I really like the emotions you're going for there, but this is a really tight shot so we don't need you to be so expressive. In this instance, less might be more. You don't need to trick your cast into doing what you want, you can just talk to them.

Idunno, every director works differently. That's what works for me. Maybe it'll work for you?
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