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Old 04-24-2012, 09:50 PM   #16
GuerrillaAngel
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I don't know what is so bad about shooting at night? Take advantage of existing lights by staging your shots so the lights work to your advantage, not the other way around. Run in some aux 12volt lamps running of car batteries to add a touch of light here and there to enhance the image.

Footage shot at night all cut together easily -- most everything matches -- none of that time of day or location mismatch problems. Your editing suite is full of tricks to make it all look good.

More than half my feature was shot outdoors at night. Think outside the box and make it work to your advantage.

Good luck.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:46 AM   #17
FernandoAndre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p38 View Post
Yeah, ditto here. Amazing how much a few flashlights like this helps the image.
Here is the same light for $16 ???

http://www.amazon.com/Ultrafire-502b...0&sr=8-2-fkmr0
This is the T6 502. Is from T series. Not bad, but Z and X are much better for film looks.

There are also flashlights which use two or even three batteries at the same time, consuming them quickly and providing an enormous amount of light. But it warm up a lot and it is a bit expensive. Begins to run away from the main benefit of using flashlights, and at this point make more sense to adopt most appropriate solutions.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:52 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by 2001 Productions View Post
Take a look at this shot:


This was shot at night, but we spent about 4 hours lighting it.

Hey 2001 Productions, nice set. Which light equipments do you used on it?

Last edited by FernandoAndre; 04-25-2012 at 09:01 AM. Reason: correcting word "used"
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:45 AM   #19
don patterson
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I like working at night. Try a lot of different no budget, lighting ideas... here are a few no-expense-spent 'lighting' ideas from 2003, using minimal lighting, (like 3 car's headlights through stretched bed sheets at different angles and depth and flashlights). We had no electricity on locations! All were shot AT NIGHT OR IN THE DARK! I love shadows!

Sorry for small size clip -- what it is... for fast downloading and ease of buffering.

Night Scenes

"Always knew these flashlights would come in handy..."
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Old 04-25-2012, 09:00 AM   #20
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Heres another night example from 2001. A music video we shot in about 4 hours. The basement had electricity but I used cool-lux lights with gells and filters for speed and control.

Got better the more I experimented.
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:24 PM   #21
2001 Productions
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Originally Posted by FernandoAndre View Post
Hey 2001 Productions, nice set. Which light equipments do you used on it?
I used pretty much everything I had in my kit.

Each boat was lit by an open-face flood through diffusion and blue gel. The lighting instruments and stands were obscured by the boats in front.

Although they're not visible in this angle, some baby fresnels were used to provide highlights on some of the boats.

Each intersection on the walkway was spotlit from above to give the impression of overhead sources.

The actors' key was a soft box off camera right.

Finally, there was a Mole Junior 2K on an embankment overlooking the mooring basin. You can't see the embankment in the far bg because I let it go black, but the Mole is just above center frame. It was spotted down and shot directly up the walkway to provide rim light as the actors approached camera.
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:27 AM   #22
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I'd take shooting at night over shooting in daylight EVERY time. Whenever I shoot an interior without a visible window the first thing I have the grips do is blackout every window in the house.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:57 AM   #23
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I'd take shooting at night over shooting in daylight EVERY time. Whenever I shoot an interior without a visible window the first thing I have the grips do is blackout every window in the house.
I know your supposed to or it's good to do his but why? Is it because you will get better results with mostly your lighting? Like I watch videos were people film at restaurants but turned off all the lights and used there own and it looked like a regular lit restaurant but if they filmed it regular it would look like crap lol...
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:42 PM   #24
chilipie
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Originally Posted by Conner Kent View Post
I know your supposed to or it's good to do his but why? Is it because you will get better results with mostly your lighting? Like I watch videos were people film at restaurants but turned off all the lights and used there own and it looked like a regular lit restaurant but if they filmed it regular it would look like crap lol...
It's to do with having control over the light. If you start from scratch then you are able to make every lighting decision for yourself. What may look acceptable to the eye can come out awfully on camera - a fluorescent light that gives the walls a funny green tinge, a spotlight in the ceiling that gives a nasty hotspot on your lead actress's nose.

There's a quote by Bill Dill, ASC from the film Cinematographer Style that rather nicely sums up the key things that lighting has to do (and why, in your example, you can't just leave it as it is) [my emphasis].
Quote:
There are three things lighting has to do. It has to provide for sufficient illumination to record the image on film. It has to make up for the difference in contrast between our eye and the film. It has to enhance the illusion of a third dimension in a two dimensional medium… okay. Well that is what it has to do. What it can do…

Last edited by chilipie; 05-01-2012 at 12:56 PM. Reason: Typo
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:52 PM   #25
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Also, when you're dealing with a micro budget, blacking out the windows saves you from having to match color temps. Unless you have HMI lighting instruments - an unlikely scenario for indies - you either have to color correct the windows - which, depending on their size, can mean a huge amount of CTO - or correct your tungsten sources with CTB, which cuts their light output by 70+ percent - i.e. a 1K fixture only provides the equivalent of 300 watts.

Last edited by 2001 Productions; 05-01-2012 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:58 PM   #26
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Exactly, every bit of light is there because we want it there and it's all perfectly matched temp. Dealing with natural light is hard. It can give beautiful results if you have the time, gear, etc... to tame it and HMIs to match it, but that's out of my league for the most part.

I'll make use of tungsten practicals, but anything of dubious color temp is cut off ASAP.
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Old 05-22-2012, 03:18 PM   #27
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Wow, @2001 - thats fantastic looking. One question! How come it took you so long to light the bg?
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Old 05-22-2012, 05:40 PM   #28
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How come it took you so long to light the bg?
Ha! Good question. Mainly because I live in a small town where nobody except me has film lighting skills, so I had to pretty much do it all by myself. I had a couple of assistants to run cables, etc., but they had no idea what instruments to use or where to place and focus them.

Also time-consuming is dressing all the stingers so they aren't visible in the frame. Plus, anytime you're working around water you need to be slow and methodical lest someone gets hurt or equipment gets damaged or lost overboard.
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:23 PM   #29
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Had an interesting experience (pre-planned) on Kohlman Files this past weekend when we were able to motivate strong light in a night scene. Reporter arrives at house after the cops have arrived. What would be the first thing the cops did.... Hook up a generator and run work lights. So we show a lit work light in frame once and that motivates strong lighting in the rest of the shots. Lots of ways to skin a cat.
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Old 05-26-2012, 04:12 PM   #30
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Tip I wanted to pass along.

This is a screen grab from The Kohlman Files.

There is an open face 650 out of frame to the right. In front of it is what we call a "branchaloris". A tree branch we cut off and attached to a C-stand in front of the light. It's creating the branch shaped shadow on the ground. Breaks that light up and stops it from being so obvious.

This is ungraded cinestyle.

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