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-   -   Would you make a feature film with a camera that has a Micro Four Thirds sensor? (http://www.indietalk.com/showthread.php?t=62637)

sammy81z 02-05-2017 03:58 PM

Would you make a feature film with a camera that has a Micro Four Thirds sensor?
 
Would you make a feature film with a camera that has a Micro Four Thirds sensor such as the Panasonic GH4 or the Blackmagic Cinema 2.5K Camera? If no, then why?

In this example above you will be using Micro Four Thirds lenses such as the Rokinon Micro Four Thirds Cine lenses. Also in this example, a lens Speedbooster would not be available for use.

I would be interested to know if you would make feature films, with the hopes of selling those films, using a camera with a Micro Four Thirds sensor.

WalterB 02-05-2017 04:13 PM

28 Days later was shot on a 1/3" camcorder.
If the movie is great nobody cares about sensorsize.

IronFilm 06-12-2017 10:12 AM

Short answer: yes!!

Longer answer:
I'd rather use a BMD Micro Cinema Camera than a BMCC
I'd rather use a Panasonic G80 than a GH4.

HKB 06-28-2017 11:36 PM

I forget the name of the indie film, but it was shot on a VHS Camcorder. I thought the film was pretty bad and confusing; however, the cinematography was actually pretty good even when projected onto a large theater screen. The filmmakers were asked about this choice and they claimed they wanted an unusual effect. Not my thing but it seemed to work for them. :hmm:

El Director 06-29-2017 12:04 AM

I'd rather use APC-C/Super 35, but if M4/3 is all I had, then sure.

HKB 06-29-2017 08:43 AM

A few months ago I did shoot a doc on a 1/3 sensor. Watched it on a large screen and no one noticed, it wasn't that bad. Would I do it again? Depends on what I'm trying to achieve. Here is a little comparison for fun, notice the sensor diagram.

http://shootdatapost.com/blog/2008/4...l-sensors.html

KnightsFan 06-29-2017 08:53 PM

Of course! Both are fantastic cameras and Rokinon lenses are perfectly adequate--provided the set includes a wide option like the 10 or 14. I did a short a while ago with a BMCC 2.5k and the widest lens in the kit was the Rokinon 24 which kinda sucked.

Though, if I could pick my kit I probably would go with other options in the price range.

jax_rox 06-30-2017 08:12 AM

Why not? If that was the camera I had, then sure!

joelhall 06-30-2017 12:24 PM

I'd make a feature on a cardboard pinhole camera if I could. Cameras are cameras and if it gives the results you want, then use it. I pretty much do all my r&g documentary footage on a Panasonic G80.

lennyblue 07-05-2017 04:50 PM

Looked fine to me
 
We did a feature last summer with a Panasonic AF100 using Rokinon lenses.

I've seen it on 3 full screens so far and it looks good.

I agree with the others. Shoot with what you've got!

I would use it again!

DeJager 07-09-2017 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WalterB (Post 421924)
28 Days later was shot on a 1/3" camcorder.
If the movie is great nobody cares about sensorsize.

This really isn't the truth anymore. It truly depends on what the plan is for distribution. There are very specific criteria for a lot of platforms now. You can even see the specific requirements for Netflix by simply looking on their website. Simply having a good story is not enough if you want to actually make money on a movie and if you have investors then that's what you need to be thinking about. If it's just your movie, and you're doing it for fun then sure use whatever camera you have access to :cool:

joelhall 07-16-2017 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronFilm (Post 426004)
Short answer: yes!!

Longer answer:
I'd rather use a BMD Micro Cinema Camera than a BMCC
I'd rather use a Panasonic G80 than a GH4.

Have to admit, I bought the G80 on a whim (and because it was 600 quid). I just love this camera. No it doesn't have all the bells and whistles of a Varicam, but it's a total bargain.

jax_rox 07-16-2017 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeJager (Post 426886)
There are very specific criteria for a lot of platforms now. You can even see the specific requirements for Netflix by simply looking on their website.

Yes, but generally distribution platforms like Netflix can still buy your movie if they like the story enough. Netflix's strict specs is mostly designed for their original content (i.e. content commissioned by Netflix themselves) as they are able to have full control.

If your production isn't a Netflix original, and they believe it would add value to their service, they'll buy it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeJager (Post 426886)
Simply having a good story is not enough if you want to actually make money on a movie

For the most part, having a decently executed version of a good story will put you in better stead than a brilliantly made film that has such a boring story that people turn off after 20 minutes....

All things being equal, a better story is what's going to make you stand out more than a better camera.

We also often talk about story as being the most important as it's often the one thing that's the most overlooked - as beginner filmmakers obsess over cameras and lenses and sound and editing, they often forget that they're actually supposed to be telling a story, and the quality of that story is what will make the movie sing first and foremost; not the quality of the camera.

Feutus Lapdance 07-17-2017 12:57 AM

Bellflower was shot on a SI-2K Digital Cinema Camera. The lenses that where used where all broken and damaged. I think the could have made the same movie with a lower budget camera. But the there are restrictions. I think Netflix will only except movies that where shot on a 4k. ( if I remember correctly, folding Ideas talk't about this) It could be that some festivals have such restrictions that a movie has to be shot in 4K or higher.

Cracker Funk 07-17-2017 03:39 AM

YES!

Every year, there's at least one movie that gets sold and distributed that was shot on a shitty camera. Every year.

Focus on the story. Get the best camera your budget will allow, but don't let any supposed inadequacies stop you from getting your vision on the big screen.

For what it's worth, my next feature is likely going to be shot on a T4i.

Best wishes! :)


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