View Full Version : 16:9 emulation on DV


surewillfilms
07-09-2005, 11:16 PM
hey everybody...I'm sure this question has been already asked countless times, but I'm a newbie, so please bear with me.

I'm shooting a feature on a Canon XL1. I've done a lot of test footage just getting to know the ins and outs of the camera (which I can't recommend enough, btw), but I only have one problem...I want to shoot this as close to 16:9 as possible, and can't afford the 35mm adapter that a friend of mine told me about ($10,000+). The camera has a built-in 16:9 emulation that it does digitally, which is alright, but the resolution goes way down when you do it that way. I don't want to just crop it in post for a number of reasons. What are my other options? Because of the interchangability of the camera, is there another lens or something that I can get? I am by no means a "techie" or anything...I'm a DP by way of director by way of writer (if that makes any sense) so please use your smallest technical words, because I get lost very easily :) Thanks for all of your help.

FilmJumper
07-10-2005, 01:46 AM
hey everybody...I'm sure this question has been already asked countless times, but I'm a newbie, so please bear with me.

I'm shooting a feature on a Canon XL1. I've done a lot of test footage just getting to know the ins and outs of the camera (which I can't recommend enough, btw), but I only have one problem...I want to shoot this as close to 16:9 as possible, and can't afford the 35mm adapter that a friend of mine told me about ($10,000+). The camera has a built-in 16:9 emulation that it does digitally, which is alright, but the resolution goes way down when you do it that way. I don't want to just crop it in post for a number of reasons. What are my other options? Because of the interchangability of the camera, is there another lens or something that I can get? I am by no means a "techie" or anything...I'm a DP by way of director by way of writer (if that makes any sense) so please use your smallest technical words, because I get lost very easily :) Thanks for all of your help.

You might want to check on the availability of an anamorphic adapter for the front of whatever lens you'll be using for your shoot.

I have a Panasonic DVX100A with the anamorphic adapter and I can't believe how much better the picture quality is. I believe Century Optics might make an adapter for the XL1.

Having said that...

They ain't cheap...

filmy

clive
07-10-2005, 04:07 AM
Filmy's right.

However, the question I guess I'd ask is why shoot on a 4:3 camera, when you want you want to produce 16:9?

Put the XL1 to one side and put the money you would have spent on an adaptor into renting a camera that will shoot in true anamorphic 16:9.

If it's a budget issue you could even look at the Sony DCR-HC42E, which is a cheapie camcorder, but with true 16:9 capabilities. I know you can buy them new in the UK for about 400, which means in the US they're probably giving them away with cornflakes.

Personally, I'd hire a decent low end professional camera, they're all 16:9/4:3 switchable. A Panasonic DVCPro25 or even better DVCPro50 would give you a great looking film. Doing this would push your post production cost up a little, unless you've got free access to panasonic decks, but in the long run it'll be worth it.

indycine
07-10-2005, 05:51 AM
If it's a budget issue you could even look at the Sony DCR-HC42E, which is a cheapie camcorder, but with true 16:9 capabilities. I know you can buy them new in the UK for about 400, which means in the US they're probably giving them away with cornflakes.

Have eaten six boxes of cornflakes.
Have yet to find Sony camera.
Will advise.

Shaw
07-10-2005, 01:55 PM
You could probably sell your XL1 and with a little saving get and XL2 for true 16:9. Granted, renting may be better - depends heavily on the project itself I think. A good anamorphic adapter will cost you around $800 USD and up. These adapters also require a good amount of technical knowledge to operate well as you end up with two different focal points (ie you have a different focus in the horizontal axis vs the vertical - limits your choice of f# and zoom).