View Full Version : Winter filming


Jthacher
03-29-2011, 08:29 PM
hello im very new to filming but have experimented with manny cameras. I go out skiing with my friends and we do a lot of tricking. Anyways the mountain is usually at a temperature from 8˚F - 20˚F. with the manny cameras i have used i have found that manny of them have had problems with the tape jamming, recording terrible quality, and constant lens fog ups. do any of you know what i can do to solve this or where i can get a good professional HD temperature resistant camera. price range >500 but i can push it if i have to and im looking for something with a hand hold. i have looked manny places and maybe you guys could help me out.

thanks J. thacher

that1guyy
03-29-2011, 09:21 PM
If you're into extreme sports I highly recommend the GoPro helmet hero cam. It shoots in 1080p and comes with a pretty tough case which is water and weather proof.

http://gopro.com/

zim9000
03-29-2011, 09:51 PM
If you're into extreme sports I highly recommend the GoPro helmet hero cam. It shoots in 1080p and comes with a pretty tough case which is water and weather proof.

http://gopro.com/

+1 Ive seen some pretty amazing videos done with this camera on youtube. Do a search for it there.

rayw
03-29-2011, 10:31 PM
Hi, JT

...with the manny cameras i have used i have found that manny of them have had problems with the tape jamming, recording terrible quality, and constant lens fog ups. do any of you know what i can do to solve this...

1 - Ditch your digital tape camera for anything recording to compact flash.
2 - Condensation is just plain and simple physics.
First, dry out your camera to remove any corrosive and particulate depositing moisture inside.
Warm and slow is good. No hair dryers! Maybe on a towel over the HVAC vent.
Second, you have to let the entire physical, thermal mass of the camera, inside and out, slowly
acclimate to the ambient temperature when moving it from the warm indoors to the freezing
outdoors. Keep it in your jacket, then let it cool off slowly.
Reverse process when returning indoors.
You probably don't want to leave it in your outside vehicle. There are still likely moving parts
inside the camera that require light lubricants that can gum up if frozen for hours.
And of course, a frozen battery won't do you any favors.

GL!


Ray

Jthacher
03-30-2011, 04:51 PM
we have a gopro and have found that it does not really work for shots outside first person. im really looking for something that can be held by a rider or on a tripod. something with a actual screen to see where you are pointing

chilipie
03-31-2011, 04:42 AM
we have a gopro and have found that it does not really work for shots outside first person. im really looking for something that can be held by a rider or on a tripod. something with a actual screen to see where you are pointing

You can get an external monitor for it made by GoPro (called the LCD BacPac) for $80/90 (making it extortionately expensive in the UK).

knightly
03-31-2011, 01:08 PM
In shoots I've done with both inside and out in winter, I give a half an hour to the camera, case unlocked, lid closed (canon hardcase) to allow the temperature to slowly change to the ambient temperature (both ways).

Keep your batteries warm between takes too, my 5 hour batter gets 15 minutes of recording in temps below 20f.