View Full Version : Diffused Sunlight?


Tinalera
01-13-2009, 05:43 PM
I didn't want to put this in the other lighting thread, as I didn't want to hi-jack and interrupt the flow, but it did put me in my mind of my situation. When on a really limited budget for a first film(like next to nil), how well can Diffused sunlight into a room work? My film short essentially takes place in one room, and I was finding that while I don't having lighting equipment, the diffused sunlight light through my thin curtains worked(from what I can see pretty well). Unfortunately by the time I came upon this site, I've pretty much shot my footage-but for next time, can sunlight be a good substitute for stronger lighting(given the cirucmstances of course)?

While I wasn't able to get the varying degrees of shading I would like, nor angled light, the toned down light fit right in with the effect I was looking for in the film in this case. (Plus what can I say, it was my first film-lessons learned :D)

indietalk
01-13-2009, 05:46 PM
You'll need to gel the windows so you are shooting the same color temperature.

Tinalera
01-13-2009, 06:27 PM
Thanks. I figured something along those lines. Like I said, lessons learned, and other than a few friends or an amateur film short festival we have in town, (and people on here should I gather the courage to put it up ;)), I don't think it will be shown a lot.

I had a blast doing it, and I was creating and reviving a passion I forgot that I had, and isn't that the important thing?

Thanks for the advice, to you and anyone else who has suggestions or their own stories of "lessons learned". :)

Zensteve
01-13-2009, 07:23 PM
If the majority of your lightsouce is from the daylight outside, you can easily get "daylight" coloured bulbs. (From K-Mart, etc) You replace the room's regular bulbs with these. They look just the same (but with bluish-tinted glass), come in most the regular shapes & sizes, and are also pretty cheap.

You'd only want to do this if you're using lots of daylight, though, with a couple of accent lights on the inside. If you're relying mainly on interior light, but with a crack of light streaming in between the curtains, it makes more sense to fix up the windows with gel scraps.

Not sure if they make 'em as FCLs. (the bulbs, that is)

Tinalera
01-13-2009, 08:05 PM
Thanks for the tip about the "daylight" bulbs-I had no idea they existed! Thanks!

The way the room lighting ended up being(and as I said earlier, you'll see it if I ever get the guts to show it*l*) is the curtains, while closed, let a fair amount of light in(they were whitish). When you watch the footage, sight is great for the most part, with only one or two "dim" scenes. I used that mixed with interior light, so it may have the "home movie" look. But things are pretty clear and visible, and they get across the atmosphere I wanted for the character. I'm discovering a lot about the lighting through this site, which happened after I was just about completed the footage.

I think the biggest thing I lost was maybe angling of lighting for moods, and maybe had the aforementioned "home movie" look . I found it strangely helpful, though, the character is wearing a mask, so less on makeup *L*

EDIT: Also(and this is probably where the temp comes in) different parts of the room were slighty different shades of light.

Overall, did I make mistakes? Heck yes. Will do things differently next time(it's all about the learning!)*L* But I'll definitely keep the gels and the daylight bulbs in mind for next time-my character is already putting another story in my head. And like I said, I had blast doing it, and learned a lot from the process and from this site! Thanks again!