View Full Version : Lighting for a perfume advert


will mcgregor
04-09-2008, 07:36 PM
Hi, Im shooting a perfume advert in the style of the Armani adverts by Fabien Baron- http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=rUMPZSzDw4E. I would like some advice.

With a basic two model and backdrop situation.

Basically I want to have two separate elements to my advert, a softly light slow tempo section- For this I should imagine I will have to use a powerful light from a distance to get a nice soft wrap around. And then use a closer harsher light to ad a shine to the models bone structure (Aided by the make up artist using a sheen make up on jaw lines to highlight them). I will also be shooting this section with a long lens as to separate the viewer from the audience and make the models feel isolated.

I will also then have a intimate, darker and moodier section intercut where the lighting level will be much lower. Should I just ditch the Key light, using the same fill to give a very gentle form and then the same close harsh light to define the form of the models? For this section I will be using a shorter lens to produce a shallower depth of field and make the scene appear more intimate and the viewer closer to the intimate action on screen. Although I have read that longer lenses are used in fashion photography as they flatten the image, so are more flattering to the models. Should I not use a shorter lense if I want to imitate the perfume ad style?

Does this sound about right to you?

Another thing is that the only lights I have are 2 2kw blondes, 4 800w reds and a couple of 150w dedo’s. I have just invested in loads of filters, diffusion spun and black wrap so I can alter my lights a fare bit. Would the effect I am after be achievable with this selection of lights? Maybe a defused or bounced Blonde as the Key, 2 reds as fill and back and a Dedo as the highlight for the facial features?

I also have another issue, all of the studios at my uni where booked out so I had to make do with a suitable class room (I have checked the load of the circuit and don’t wory I won’t blow any fuses) The problem with the class room is that the ceiling is only about 8ft high! So I cant get a very high key light. Would just bouncing the light of off the ceiling be OK? What affect would bouncing the light of off the ceiling have over having the light further away from the subject but direct? Would it make any difference?

Also I have been advised to shout using ND filters, what advantage does this have to help me create the style I am after?

Also should I shoot on a different f-stop for the different sections of my advert? I read that I need a lower f-stop as possible to imitate fashion style cinematography?

I am shooting on a Canon XH A1, I have chosen this over the Sony Z1 as it gives a softer image. Im shooting on HD, recording onto a hard drive. Im trying to get my hands on a Redrock lens adapter, but I think I can manage without as I have a wide angle screw on lens for the moody intimate bit and the fixed video lens on the A1 is long enough for my slow tempo, softly light section.

Any advice on any of the points above would be greatly appreciated.

If you would like to see some of my work then please follow this link-

www.icewhole.com/wmcgregor.

I am a first year student, so any help would be very appreciated.

Thanks.

Will McGregor

oakstreetphotovideo
04-09-2008, 11:11 PM
I just have a couple of corrections to throw in. The focal length of the lens doesn't really impact DOF, but camera-to-subject distance, aperture setting and the size of the focal plane do; your description is correct if you're going to use a shorter lens to get your camera in very close to the subject. Generally it's easier to light if the camera is back a bit. I like to move the subject further from the background and use lighting to enhance the separation, in addition to shallow DOF.

My second point is about your description of your lighting setup, with the distant light being the "soft" light. The further you move a light from the subject, the more it becomes like a point light, which throws very harsh shadows (i.e. not soft). For a really soft light, you want a large soft box in as close as you can get it.

Otherwise, I'd have to see your setup to even begin to make suggestions.

Doug